Articles

Mayday and SOS Origins

 

Why People on Planes and Ships Use the Word Mayday When in Distress and What SOS Really Stands For

In 1923, a senior radio officer, Frederick Stanley Mockford, in Croydon Airport in London, England, was asked to think of one word that would be easy to understand for all pilots and ground staff in the event of an emergency.

The problem had arisen as voice radio communication slowly became more common, so an equivalent to the Morse code “SOS” distress signal was needed. Obvious a word like “help” wasn’t a good choice for English speakers because it could be commonly used in normal conversations where no one was in distress.

At the time Mockford was considering the request, much of the traffic he was dealing with was between Croydon and Le Bourget Airport in Paris, France. With both the French and English languages in mind, he came up with the somewhat unique word “Mayday,” the Anglicized spelling of the French pronunciation of the word “m’aider,” which means “help me.”

Four years later, in 1927, the International Radiotelegraph Convention of Washington made “Mayday” the official voice distress call used only to communicate the most serious level of distress, such as with life-threatening emergencies.

When using Mayday in a distress call, it is traditional to repeat it three times in a row, “Mayday, Mayday, Mayday.” This is to make sure it is easily distinguishable from a message about a Mayday call and from any similar sounding phrases in noisy conditions or garbled transmissions.

In situations where a vessel merely requires assistance, but is not in grave and imminent danger, a distress call of “pan-pan” can be used instead. Essentially, it means you need aid, but you don’t need support personnel to necessarily drop what they’re doing right that instant and come help you, as with a Mayday.

Like Mayday, pan-pan is the Anglicized spelling of a French word, in this case “panne,” which means “broken / failure / breakdown.” Also, as with Mayday, one should state it three consecutive times: “pan-pan pan-pan pan-pan,” followed by which station(s) you are addressing and your last known location, nature of your emergency, etc.

If there is no reply to a Mayday or pan-pan call by the Coast Guard or other emergency agency, and a couple minutes have passed since the last call, some other radio source, such as another ship or plane that received the call, should transmit their own Mayday call, but on behalf of the ship or plane that first made the call, repeating the pertinent information they heard when they received the Mayday message.

 

Post from Today I found Out…

Sweet Fanny Adams

 

Today is the anniversary of Fanny Adams’ death (30 April 1859 – 24 August 1867), a young English girl murdered by solicitor’s clerk Frederick Baker in Alton, Hampshire. The expression “sweet Fanny Adams” refers to her and has come, through British naval slang, to mean “nothing at all”.

On Saturday, 24 August 1867, at about 1:30 pm, Fanny’s mother, Harriet Adams, let the eight-year-old Fanny, her friend Minnie Warner (aged 8) and Fanny’s sister Lizzie (aged 7) go up Tanhouse Lane towards Flood Meadow.

In the lane they met Frederick Baker, a 29-year-old solicitor’s clerk. Baker offered Minnie and Lizzie three halfpence to go and spend and offered Fanny a halfpenny to accompany him towards Shalden, a couple of miles north of Alton. She took the coin but refused to go. He carried her into a hops field, out of sight of the other girls.

At about 5:00 pm, Minnie and Lizzie returned home. Their neighbour, Mrs. Gardiner, asked them where Fanny was, and they told her what had happened. Mrs. Gardiner told Harriet, and they went up the lane, where they came upon Baker coming back. They questioned him and he said he had given the girls money for sweets, but that was all. His respectability meant the women let him go on his way.

At about 7:00 pm, Fanny was still missing, and neighbours went searching. They found Fanny’s body in the hop field, horribly butchered. Her head and legs had been severed and her eyes removed. Her eyes had been thrown into the nearby river. Her torso had been emptied and her organs scattered (it took several days for all her remains to be found). Her remains were taken to and put back together in a nearby doctor’s surgery at 16 Amery Street.

Harriet ran to The Butts field where her husband, bricklayer George Adams, was playing cricket. She told him what had happened, then collapsed. George got his shotgun from home and set off to find the perpetrator, but neighbours stopped him.

That evening Police Superintendent William Cheyney arrested Baker at his place of work: the offices of solicitor William Clement in the High Street. He was led through an angry mob to the police station. There was blood on his shirt and trousers, which he could not explain, but he protested his innocence. He was searched and found to have two small blood-stained knives on him.

Witnesses put Baker in the area, returning to his office at about 3:00 pm, then going out again. Baker’s workmate, fellow clerk Maurice Biddle, reported that, when drinking in the Swan that evening, Baker had said he might leave town. When Biddle replied that he might have trouble getting another job, Baker said, chillingly with hindsight, “I could go as a butcher”. On 26 August, the police found Baker’s diary in his office. It contained a damning entry:

24th August, Saturday – killed a young girl. It was fine and hot.

On Tuesday, 27 August, Deputy County Coroner Robert Harfield held an inquest. Painter William Walker had found a stone with blood, long hair and flesh; police surgeon, Dr Louis Leslie had carried out a post mortem and concluded that death was by a blow to the head and that the stone was the murder weapon. Baker said nothing, except that he was innocent. The jury returned a verdict of wilful murder. On the 29th, the local magistrates committed Baker for trial at the Winchester County Assizes. The police had difficulty protecting him from the mob.

At his trial on 05 December, the defence contested Millie Warner’s identification of Baker and claimed the knives found were too small for the crime anyway. They also argued insanity: Baker’s father had been violent, a cousin had been in asylums, his sister had died of a brain fever and he himself had attempted suicide after a love affair. The defence also argued that the diary entry was typical of the “epileptic or formal way of entry” that the defendant used and that the absence of a comma after the word killed did not render the entry a confession.

Justice Mellor invited the jury to consider a verdict of not responsible by reason of insanity, but they returned a guilty verdict after just fifteen minutes. On 24 December, Christmas Eve, Baker was hanged outside Winchester Gaol. The crime had become notorious and a crowd of 5,000 attended the execution. Before his death, Baker wrote to the Adamses expressing his sorrow for what he had done “in an unguarded hour” and seeking their forgiveness.

Fanny was buried in Alton cemetery. The headstone, erected by voluntary subscription, reads:

Sacred to the memory of Fanny Adams aged 8 years and 4 months who was cruelly murdered on Saturday August 24th 1867. Fear not them which kill the body but are not able to kill the soul but rather fear Him which is able to destroy both body and soul in hell. Matthew 10 v 28.

In 1869 new rations of tinned mutton were introduced for British seamen. They were unimpressed by it, and suggested it might be the butchered remains of Fanny Adams. The way her body had been strewn over a wide area presumably encouraged speculation that parts of her had been found at the Royal Navy victualing yard in Deptford, which was a large facility which included stores, a bakery and an abattoir.

“Fanny Adams” became slang for mutton or stew and then for anything worthless – from which comes the current use of “sweet Fanny Adams” (or just “sweet F.A.”) to mean “nothing at all”.

This is not the only example of Royal Navy slang relating to unpopular rations: even today, tins of steak and kidney pudding are known as “baby’s head”. The large tins the mutton was delivered in were reused as mess tins. Up until that time, when sailors and Royal Marines lived, ate and slept in their mess decks, wooden buckets were used to collect food from the galley, water for washing crockery etc. and to collect the Rum Ration. The empty meat tins were modified and gradually replaced the wooden buckets. These new buckets were given the slang name ‘Fannies’.

Mess tins or cooking pots are still known as Fannies.

 

 

It took 15 years to save MT-2800

After decades of neglect and threat of destruction MT2800 has a proper home and a future.

MT 2800 built by British Power Boat Company at their Hythe yard as a 24ft marine Tender Mk II and was assigned the Yard number 1961.

 

She was completed and taken on charge by the RAF at 62 MU Dumbarton on 24 September 1941, allocated the RAF hull number 2800 and was immediately allocated for service in Durban in South Africa, arriving there in late 1941.

 

She served until the 1990s and then languished in various locations, her continued survival fought for by a few dedicated individuals who have passed on the baton of care from one to the other.Durban Harbour on the East coast of South Africa is renowned as a major port, but from the 1930’s to the late 1950’s it was an important hub for civilian and military flying boats.

 

Imperial Airways Short C class, which opened the first commercial air route to Europe, and warlike Sunderland and Catalina flying boats that watched over the convoys of World War II and ships in peace time, used the harbour as a base.

 

Zulu Jetty – boats at the Umsingazi base jetty (Robert Page and FAD)
Zulu Jetty – boats at the Umsingazi base jetty (Robert Page and FAD)

The MT was assigned to Durban to support the flying boat service between South Africa and Great Britain and then to 262 Squadron RAF from November 1942.

 

Initially operating Consolidated Catalina aircraft the squadron patrolled the increasingly busy Indian Ocean, watching for U boats and giving assistance to vessels in distress.

 

The many ship convoys that stopped in Durban for resupply interfered with flying and the RAF operations were moved to Langebaan on the west coast and St Lucia in the then Zululand in 1943. The Catalina’s were being gradually replaced by the large Short Sunderland Mk 5 which drew over five foot of water and St Lucia proved to be  too shallow. Looking for deeper water the Squadron moved to Umsingazi toward the end of 1944.

 

RAF records show that 1961/MT2800 was based at St Lucia in 1943 and it is probable that she moved to the new base in 1944. Contemporary photographs show a number of similar vessel tied up to the Squadron jetty.

 

Sunderland
Sunderland – A 35 SQN Sunderland lies moored at the base at Congella. The aircraft’s name painted on her nose is ‘Little Zulu Lulu’. Launch 999 is a sister ship to 2800 (Lebbeus Laybutt and FAD

By 1945 there were so many South Africans on strength that it was decided to transfer the squadron to the SAAF and it became 35 Squadron SAAF.  Once again operations returned to Congella in Durban. However the planes were not allowed to land in Durban at night for fear of colliding with the fishing boats active in the harbour and the Umsingazi base was retained as an alternative alighting facility.

 

With the war over the famous SAAF shuttle service was put in place to bring the troops home. One route was flown by the flying boats from Cairo to Durban. During November and December 1945 it was recorded that 1022 troops had been brought home and 72526lbs or 32966kgs of Christmas packages delivered to the waiting men in Egypt.

 

The last Sunderland left North Africa on 26 February 1946 with the commander of the South African 6th Armoured Division, Major General Evered Poole on board.

 

Records show that MT2800 was based in Congella in February 1945, and it is possible that she was used to transport many of these returning soldiers from flying boat to shore.

 

Although the days of flying boats drew to close in the 1950s the SAAF retained some elements of it is maritime unit that had saved over 600 lives during the war. MT2800 served at Langebaan lagoon attached to the No I Motor Boat Squadron and was then transferred to No 3 Motor Boat Flight along with 3 SAAF 63ft Miami class high speed launches and two dinghies on 5 December 1956.

 

Service continued with the Air Force until the Navy took over the marine unit in 1969. MT 2800 was eventually ‘Struck Off Charge’ by the South African Navy (SAN) in 1990.

 

In SAN service she was painted grey with a green deck, yellow engine cover and displayed her number in yellow on the bow. For a short time she was used as a pleasure craft and was painted blue and christened CAMERON L, the name she still carried into the new century.

 

Willie Burger, of the West Coast SAAFA, saved the boat from destruction when the tender was up for disposal in 1997. He highlighted its’ historical importance and made plans for its preservation. Funding was difficult and there were ideas that using her as a pleasure cruiser would pay for the upkeep, but these plans failed.

 

She was stored undercover in a set of open sheds within a secure lock up outside the Langebaan air force base, where she suffered very little damage, but was under continual threat of a scrapping order.

 

The Old Boat Trust was established by Guy Ellis in 2003 to preserve the boat. For two years various schemes and ideas were explored to find a location or organisation which could provide a secure future for MT2800. Westlake Technical College came to the rescue.

 

The College had established a shipwrights’ school and agreed to take the boat on as an educational project. One hot February day in 2006 the SAAF provided a large truck and staff to load the boat and drove it south to Westlake. Unloading a two and a half ton boat and its cradle took a great deal of ingenuity and muscle power, as there were no heavy lifting capabilities at the College. Through brute force, clever thinking and care MT2800 was put under cover.

 

Westlake 2006
Westlake 2006 – Manually unloading MT2800 at Westlake College (Guy Ellis)

 

At this stage she represented the last vestige of an RAF link to Westlake, which during the war had served as barracks to the RAF personnel who served on the SAAF air sea rescue launches. It is a good possibility that some men who had been accommodated at Westlake had at some stage driven or been transported by MT2800.

 

Westlake store
Westlake Store – Ahead of great restoration plans MT2800 at the college in 2006 (Guy Ellis)

 

Modern day boat building does not demand the skills needed to work on a clinker built wooden marine tender. There was no space in the curriculum for work on the boat and it remained untouched, luckily mostly undercover and reasonably secure.

 

By the end of 2009 it was clear that a new location had to be found. Richard Hellyer began to investigate the feasibility of returning the boat to the UK for the Portsmouth Naval Trust. There were no funds for the building of a new cradle or to cover the costs of shipment on a container vessel.

 

When it was clear that MT2800 would remain in South Africa, Charles Hellyer took on the task of finding a solution. These ranged from a private organization to mounting the boat at the entrance to the collage as a gate guard. The former would not have ensured her existence as an artefact of military history and the later was fraught with issues around protecting the boat from the elements and vandalisation.

 

Removal 2012
Removal 2012 – MT2800 being removed from Westlake to the SAN museum in Simon’s Town (Leon Steyn)

 

Contact was made with of the South African Navy in November 2011 and through the efforts of Leon Steyn of the Navy Museum she was moved to Simons Town naval base on 6 September 2012. Here she will be restored over three years as part of the Armscor apprentice scheme and put on display when complete.

 

Simonstown 2012
Simonstown 2012 – The boat waiting to be unloaded into the Museum (Leon Steyn)

Bibliography

Hellyer, R., British Military Powerboat Team, http://www.bmpt.org.uk/

Jackson, Allan., Facts about Durban, http://www.fad.co.za/

Ellis G., Serve to Save, The South African Air Force at Sea, Freeworld Publications, 2001

http://www.asrmcs-club.com/boatswebsite/index.html

Thanks to:

Richard Hellyer

Charles Hellyer

John Leech

South African Navy – Cdr Leon Steyn

Westlake Technical College – Mark Cornelise, Tracy-Lee Anderson, Johan, Mike and the Class of 2006

SAAF – Pretoria – General Derek Page Langebaabweg – Herman Els, Mattrass van Staden and Col Jacques Niemann

 

HMS Dorsetshire and HMS Cornwall

DorsetshireCornwall

The Cruisers HMS Dorsetshire and HMS Cornwall were attacked and sunk on the 5th April 1942 Japanese aircraft.

 

The ships were spotted by a reconnaissance aircraft from the heavy cruiser Tone, and subsequently attached by over 50 Val dive bombers. In less that 8 minutes HMS Dorsetshire had been hit by 10 bombs, and sank stern first after one bomb detonated a magazine.

 

HMS Cornwall was hit 8 times and sank bow first 10 minutes after HMS Cornwall.

 

The following day the cruiser Enterprise, accompanies by two destroyers Panther and Paladin rescued 1,122 men out of a combined crew of over 1,546. Among the casualties were 39 South Africans.

 

These two links provide an insight into the experiences of the crew:

Lt E. A Drew, Engineering Branch, HMS Cornwall

Walter Fudge, HMS Dorsetshire

 

The South Africans are honoured on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

Moroccan Navy orders Damen water barge

The Royal Moroccan Navy has contracted Netherlands-based Damen Shipyards to build a water barge to help relieve the severe drought in the country, the company announced on 15 August.
Damen said this would be the first time that it will combine its Stan Pontoon 3011 barge with water-making

Source: Janes

SA Naval Casualties in WW2

 

Compiled by Don Kindell

ABRAHAMS, Henry, Able Seaman, CN/ 719204 (SANF), SANF, 19 November 1944, died

ADAMS, Douglas E H, Act/Able Seaman, RNVR, 66378 (SANF), SS Tunisia, 4 August 1941, ship loss (President III, O/P), MPK

ADAMS, Thomas A, Able Seaman, 67953 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

ADAMSON, William D, Ordinary Seaman, RNVR, 69001 (SANF), Repulse, 10 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

AINSLIE, Roy, Petty Officer, 66382 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 September 1940, died

ALLISON, Oswald H, Able Seaman, RNVR, 67349 (SA), Gloucester, 8 July 1940, bombing, killed

ANDERS, John, Steward, 69637 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

ANDERSON, Henry G, Able Seaman, 67501 (SANF), Hollyhock, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

ANDERSON, Richard W N, Able Seaman, 86082 (SANF), Syvern, 21 May 1941, killed

ANDERSON, Robert D, Engine Room Artificer 2c, 71067 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

ANGEL, Walter J H, Able Seaman, 67351 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

ATKIN, William B, Lieutenant SANF, Northern Duke, 26 January 1944, illness, died

AUSTIN-SMITH, John R, Ordinary Seaman, 67336 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

 

BAGSHAWE-SMITH, Philip R, Ordinary Seaman, 67337 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

BAGSHAWE-SMITH, Sydney Q, Able Seaman, 68454 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK (brothers from East London, Cape Province)

BAKER, Dennis E W, Ordinary Seaman, 68617 (SANF), Barham, 25 November 1941, ship loss, MPK

BARBER, Benjamin W R, Sub Lieutenant SANF, Copra, 25 February 1946, died

BARBER, Edgar F, Able Seaman, 67302 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

BARKER, Ronald E, Sub Lieutenant SANF, Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

BASTON, Douglas T, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, 68600 (SANF), Hollyhock, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BATEMAN, T (initial only), Chief Engine Room Artificer, 71627 (SANF), SANF, 30 June 1943, died

BATES, John S, Stoker 2c, 68924 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BAWDEN, Wilfred R, Stoker 2c, RNVR, 330425 (SANF), Orion, 16 September 1942, DOWS

BECKER, Stanley H, Able Seaman, 67474 (SANF), Carnarvon Castle, 5 January 1942, road accident, killed

BELL, Douglas S, Ty/Act/Leading Stoker, 67243 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BENNETT, John F, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, 330351 (SANF), Hecla, 12 November 1942, ship loss, MPK

BERMAN, Nicholas, Ordinary Seaman, 616728 V (SANF), SANF, 22 November 1944, died

BESTEL, Emmanuel A N M, Lieutenant SANF, SANF, 21 September 1943, Diego Suarez, died

BESTER, A (initial only) T, Leading Stoker, 6640 (SANF), Africana (SANF), 15 April 1940, died

BESWETHERICK, Hedley C, Ordinary Seaman, RNVR, 86671 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BETTS, Robert, Able Seaman, 68900 (SANF), SANF, 18 November 1943, died

BISSETT, Alexander, Lieutenant SANF, SANF, 16 June 1944, died

BLAKE, Robert E, Petty Officer, P 6572 (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

BOSHOFF, Christofel J, Able Seaman, 70339 (SANF), Blaauwberg (SANF), 10 August 1943, killed

BOSWELL, Louis F W, Chief Engine Room Artificer, 69756V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 14 November 1944, MPK

BOTES, John S, Stoker 2c, RNVR, 68924 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BOTHA, Herkulas, Cook, 562093 V (SANF), SANF, 8 May 1944, died

BOTHA, J (initial only) F, Able Seaman, 585386 (SANF), SANF, 8 December 1945, died

BOWER, Robert, Stoker 1c, 69935 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

BRAND, Leslie A, Able Seaman, 69828 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

BROCKLEHURST, Peter S, Able Seaman, 70457 (SANF), Parktown (SANF), 21 June 1942, ship loss, MPK

BROWN, Ian H, Able Seaman, 71719 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

BRUCE, Alexander M, Stoker 2c, 67907 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BRUCE, John, Able Seaman, 67355 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

BRYSON, Neil W, Ordinary Telegraphist, 69147 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BUCHANAN, Alexander, Able Seaman, 67934 (SANF), Birmingham, 20 April 1942, died

BUITENDACH, James M, Stoker 2c, 69223 (SANF), Hollyhock, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BURNIE, Ian A, Able Seaman, 67786 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BYRNE, Patrick, Lieutenant SANF, Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

 

CALDER, Frank T, Ordinary Seaman, 67971 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

CAMPBELL, Roy M, Able Seaman, 67318 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

CARLELSE, Frederick, Able Seaman, CN/ 72004 (SANF), Soetvlei (SANF), 29 September 1942, died

CARTER, Frederick G, Able Seaman, 67345 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

CASSON, William, Able Seaman, 252935 V (SANF), Tordonn (SANF), 10 May 1941, died

CAULFIELD, Patrick, Steward, 69802 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

CHANDLER, Charles R D, Cook (S), 69613 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

CHENOWETH, Richard, Stoker 1c, 67420 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

CHILTON, Ronald H D, Ordinary Seaman, 67335 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

CHRISTIAN, J (initial only) W, Able Seaman, CN/ 71965 (SANF), SANF, 5 May 1945, died

CLARE, Frederick W, Chief Petty Officer, 69599 V (SANF), SANF, 3 June 1945, died

CLARKE, Reginald E, Ty/Lieutenant Commander SANF, Adamant, 24 July 1945, air crash, MPK

CLAYTON, Frederick H, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, 68102 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

COCHRANE, Joseph, Engine Room Artificer 3c, P 68947 (SANF), SS Empress Of Canada, 13 March 1943, ship loss (Pembroke, O/P), MPK

COMMERFORD, Noel P, Able Seaman, RNVR, 66493 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

COMMERFORD, Terence, Ordinary Seaman, 330258 (SANF), Express, 21 June 1942, died

COOK, John A, Stoker 1c, 70256 (SANF), Parktown (SANF), 21 June 1942, ship loss, MPK

COOK, W (initial only), Leading Stoker, 70527 V (SANF), SANF, 8 August 1945, died

CRAGG, Ronald F, Able Seaman (DEMS), 66488 (SANF), SS Llandilo, 2 November 1942, ship loss (President III, O/P), MPK

CRAWFORD, Cecil E, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, RNVR, 67922 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

CROSSLEY, Alfred H, Sub Lieutenant SANF, Saunders, 7 March 1943, MPK

 

DANIELS, Adam, Stoker, 72034 (SANF), SANF, 28 January 1944, died

DAVIE, William, Stoker 1c, 70681 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

DE CASTRO, Alfred T, Stoker 1c, 67914 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

DE KLERK, John, Ordinary Seaman, 585868 V (SANF), SANF, 4 May 1944, died

DE KOCK, Victor P De C, Ty/Lieutenant SANF, Saunders, 7 March 1943, MPK

DELL, Rodney, Able Seaman, 68866 (SANF), Adriat (SANF), 24 March 1943, killed

DICKSON, M (initial only) A, Sub Lieutenant SANF, SANF, 17 October 1946, died

DIXON, Robert, Able Seaman, CN/ 584276 (SANF), SANF, 11 January 1945, died

DIXON, Serfas, Able Seaman, 67743 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

DORE, Frank B, Act/Able Seaman, RNVR, 67218 (SANF), ST La Carriere, 25 February 1942, ship loss (President III, O/P), MPK

DRUMMOND, Valentine W, Able Seaman, 68043 (SANF), Edinburgh, 30 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

DRURY, Frederick, Ordinary Seaman, 68315 (SANF), Sotra, 29 January 1942, ship loss, MPK

DU PREEZ, Charles P H, Able Seaman, 68175 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

DUTTON, Charles C, Stoker 2c, RNVR, 68949 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

 

EDWARDS, Ronald E, Ordinary Seaman, 67384 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

ELLIOT, Edward R, Leading Seaman, 66584 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

ENGELBEEN, Leslie C, Able Seaman, 562235 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

EVENPOEL, Albert, Stoker 2c, 67909 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

 

FAIRLEY, Alexander E, Sub Lieutenant SANF, Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

FEW, Jim, Able Seaman, 67744 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

FLANAGAN, Terrence D, Able Seaman, 587088 (SANF), SANF, 5 May 1946, died

FLINT, John M, Act/Able Seaman (DEMS), P 562749 (SANF), SS Empire Lake, 15 July 1943, ship loss (President III, O/P), MPK

FLORENCE, John, Stoker, CN/ 71982 V (SANF), SANF, 18 January 1944, died

FRIEDLANDER, Cecil A, Able Seaman, 114703 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

FROST, M (initial only) L, Able Seaman, CN/ 71804 (SANF), Receiffe (SANF), 17 August 1942, died

FULLFORD, Watton, Chief Petty Officer, 69711 (SANF), SANF, 8 June 1946, died

 

GARDINER, Elliott, Able Seaman, 67260 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

GEFFEN, Sender, Stoker 1c, 68035 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

GERAGHTY, Herbert C, Able Seaman, 67338 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

GILBRIDE, Charles S, Lieutenant (Sp) SANF, Goede Hoop (SANF), 29 December 1946, died

GITTINS, Victor L, Ordinary Seaman, 69325 (SANF), Assegai, 27 January 1943, died

GLENN, Paul V, Ordinary Seaman, 68906 (SANF), Barham, 25 November 1941, ship loss, DOW

GREENACRE, John H, Leading Seaman, 69677 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

GROGAN, Graham B, Able Seaman, 67343 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

 

HAINES, Eric G, Able Seaman, 67697 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

HALLIFAX, Guy W, Rear Admiral SANF, Director of SA Forces, 28 March 1941, accident, killed

HANSLO, Raymond F, Able Seaman, RNVR, 68295 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

HARLE, Paul A, Petty Officer, 71796 (SANF), SANF, 3 October 1943, died

HARRIS, R (initial only) H, Telegraphist, 330488 (SANF), SANF, 16 December 1943, died

HAWKINS, Reginald D, Able Seaman, 66700 (SANF), Cornwall, 4 March 1942, illness, died

HAYES, Richard T, Ordinary Seaman, 68499 (SANF), Barham, 25 November 1941, ship loss, MPK

HEARD, George A, Lieutenant SANF, Goede Hoop (SANF), 8 August 1945, died

HEASMAN, Gratwicke E E, Engine Room Artificer 4c, 69784 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

HENDERSON, Alexander P, Chief Engine Room Artificer, 562099 (SANF), SANF, 1 April 1943, Benghazi Libya, killed

HOGG, Roy S, Sub Lieutenant SANF, Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

HOLT, Albert E, Telegraphist, 69576 (SANF), Southern Maid (SANF), 3 June 1941, killed

HOOK, Aubrey C, Able Seaman, 67862 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

HORNE, P (initial only) D, Chief Petty Officer, 66661 V (SANF), SANF, 31 March 1945, died

HOWARD, Harold D, Signalman, 67289 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

HOWDEN, Russell K, Ty/Sub Lieutenant SANF, ML 1163, 4 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

HOWE, Horace G, Ordinary Seaman, RNVR, 68680 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

HUBBARD, Wallace S, Able Seaman, 67960 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

HUGHES, T (initial only) J, Stoker, 71383 (SANF), SANF, 10 May 1941, died

 

INNES, Ian Mck, Sub Lieutenant SANF, Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

ISAACS, N (initial only), Able Seaman, CN/ 584368 V (SANF), SANF, 14 May 1946, died

 

JACOBZ, Frank H, Stoker 1c, 70374 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

JAGGER, Leslie J, Lieutenant SANF, 70016 (SANF), Parktown (SANF), 21 June 1942, ship loss, MPK

JAMES, H (initial only), Steward, CN/ 72252 (SANF), Gonding (SANF), 9 May 1943, died

JAMES, Victor F, Ordinary Seaman, 67303 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

JANSEN, S (initial only) C, Able Seaman, CN/ 584477 V (SANF), SANF, 4 October 1945, died

JENKINS, Edward G, Engine Room Artificer, 66720 V (SANF), SANF, 14 September 1944, died

JENSEN, Niels P, Able Seaman, 67347 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

JOHNSTONE, Henry N, Lieutenant Commander (E) SANF, 66727, Birmingham, 18 August 1942, died

JUBY, Kenneth J, Ordinary Seaman, 69211 (SANF), Hollyhock, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

 

KEENEY, Frederick W, Able Seaman, 67748 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

KEET, H (initial only) M T, Able Seaman, 586028 (SANF), SANF, 4 May 1946, died

KEITH, Kenneth I B, Able Seaman, RNVR, 66742 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

KEMACK, Brian N, Signalman, 67883 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

KEMERY, S (initial only) P, Leading Writer, 67275 (SANF), SANF, 20 February 1946, died

KEMP, Thomas, Able Seaman, CN/ 71015 V (SANF), SANF, 20 September 1944, died

KENDRICK, George, Stoker 2c, 67910 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

KENYON, Graeme A B, Able Seaman, RNVR, 68002 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

KEOWN, R (initial only) J, Able Seaman, CN/ 71845 (SANF), SANF, 9 June 1945, died

KERSTOFFEL, H (initial only), Stoker, 72310 (SANF), SANF, 14 September 1945, died

KEYTEL, Roy, Able Seaman, 67296 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

KIMBLE, Dennis C, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, 67600 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

KIRSTEN, Monty G W, Able Seaman, RNVR, 68917 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

KONIG, E (initial only), Stoker, 584989 V (SANF), SANF, 27 June 1947, died

KRAUSE, Frederick E, Able Seaman, 68321 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

 

LA CHARD, Edwin, Lieutenant Commander SANF, SANF, 20 May 1943, died

LA GRANGE, Antony M, Sub Lieutenant (A) SANF, 1772 Sqn Indefatigable, 28 July 1945, air operations, MPK

LAMONT, J (initial only), Steward, 71402 (SANF), SANF, 24 February 1945, died

LAW, Edward, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, RNVR, 66760 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

LEACH, Peter A D H, Stoker 2c, 69225 (SANF), Hollyhock, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

LENZ, William, Able Seaman, 69544 (SANF), SANF, 29 August 1943, died

LIDDLE, John, Lieutenant SANF, Barbrake, 8 August 1945, MPK

LLOYD, George H, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, 330353 (SANF), Hecla, 12 November 1942, ship loss, MPK

LOUW, Joseph, Stoker, CN 72175 (SANF), Stork, 2 December 1943, illness, died

LUCAS, A (initial only) W, Able Seaman, 152875 (SANF), SANF, 28 May 1943, died

LUCAS, E (initial only) W R, Chief Engineman, 66756 (SANF), SANF, 4 October 1939, died

 

MACWHIRTER, Cecil J, Ty/Sub Lieutenant (A) SANF, 851 Sqn Shah, 14 April 1944, air crash, MPK

MARSH, Reginald H Y, Able Seaman, 69911 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

MATTHEWS, George A, Stoker 1c, 70728 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

MCCARTHY, Henry F, Ordinary Seaman, 67223 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

MCDAVID, William K, Stoker 2c, RNVR, 69138 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

MCEWAN, William A, Steward, 69686 (SANF), Parktown (SANF), 21 June 1942, ship loss, MPK

MCINTYRE, Norman G, Able Seaman, 67446 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

MCINTYRE, William G, Cook (S), 585360 (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

MCLARTY, William D, Leading Stoker, 562246 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

MCLEAN, Godfrey, Able Seaman, 562455 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

MCLEAN, Richard, Stoker, 562567 (SANF), Smalvlei (SANF), 29 November 1943, died

MCLELLAN, Robert, Ordinary Telegraphist, 67897 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

MERRYWEATHER, John, Able Seaman, 67952 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

MEYRICK, Walter, Ordinary Signalman, 68155 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

MITCHELL, William A, Stoker 1c, RNVR, 68796 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

MITCHELL, William N, Able Seaman, 69787 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

MOORE, Albert, Able Seaman, 67416 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

MORRIS, Cyril D, Ordinary Seaman, 68932 (SANF), Barham, 25 November 1941, ship loss, MPK

MORRIS, Rodney, Ordinary Signalman, 68596 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

MORROW, Douglas E, Able Seaman, 67989 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

MOSCOS, John G, Leading Writer, 66786 (SANF), SS Ceramic, 7 December 1942, ship loss (SANF, O/P), MPK

MURPHY, J (initial only), Able Seaman, CN/ 72256 (SANF), SANF, 16 August 1942, died

 

NEL, Eloff R, Able Seaman, 69635 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

NICHOLLS, John, Yeoman of Signals, 66824 V (SANF), SANF, 19 December 1943, died

NICHOLSON, Douglas O, Able Seaman, 66833 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

NICOLSON, Andrew, Cook, 63827 (SANF), Disa (SANF), 13 October 1939, died

NIGHTSCALES, Norman, Writer, 68148 (SANF), Fidelity, 30 December 1942, ship loss, MPK

NILAND, St John E, Able Seaman, 209905 (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

NORTMAN, Willem, Stoker, 590608 V (SANF), SANF, 28 June 1946, died

NOWLAN, Francis C, Able Seaman, RNVR, 67409 (SANF), Gloucester, 8 July 1940, bombing, DOW

 

OLLERHEAD, Owen, Lieutenant SANF, SANF, 14 November 1946, died

ORGILL, C (initial only) B, Able Seaman, CN/ 71947 (SANF), SANF, 14 May 1943, died

ORTON, Charles P, Able Seaman, 68009 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

 

PAGE, Robert, Sub Lieutenant SANF, SANF, 29 November 1943, died

PALMER, Walter A, Able Seaman, RNVR, 68344 (SANF), Cornwall, 6 April 1942, ship loss (rescued aboard HMS Enterprise), DOW

PEERS, Charles V, Able Seaman, 562653 (SANF), Hecla, 12 November 1942, ship loss, MPK

PERRY, Desmond A, Petty Officer, 71211 (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

PETERS, Norman, Leading Stoker, 66847 (SANF), SANF, 3 January 1943, died

PETERSON, W (initial only) J, Able Seaman, CN/ 72184 (SANF), SANF, 4 September 1942, died

PFAFF, C (initial only) E, Petty Officer Stoker, 562721 V (SANF), SANF, 20 April 1945, died

PITTS, S (initial only) L, Able Seaman, CN/ 564203 (SANF), SANF, 8 November 1945, died

PLATT, Ronald M, Petty Officer, 67160 V (SANF), President III, 26 February 1943, accident, killed

POGGENPOEL, D (initial only) B, Able Seaman, CN/ 71950 V (SANF), SANF, 7 June 1947, died

POVEY, Leonard, Able Seaman, 71182 V (SANF), SANF, 31 March 1945, died

PRICE, David, Able Seaman, RNVR, P/68529 (SANF), Niger, 6 July 1942, ship loss, MPK

PUGH, John R, Able Seaman, 66877 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

 

RANKIN, Cecil R, Signalman, 67879 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

RAPHAEL, Philip R, Able Seaman, 67841 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

RASMUSSEN, Victor J S, Leading Telegraphist, 66920 (SANF), Dunedin, 24 November 1941, ship loss, MPK

RAVENS, Albert, Able Seaman, CN/ 72213 V (SANF), SANF, 31 March 1944, died

REDMAN, Roland A, Leading Stoker, 67406 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

REHR, Cecil, Able Seaman, 69877 (SANF), Roodepoort (SANF), 25 September 1942, died

REID, Kenneth H, Signalman, 562143 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

RICHARDSON, Ronald P, Able Seaman, 67494 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

ROBBERTS, Kaspar, Petty Officer, P/ 5285 (SANF), SANF, 1 July 1943, died

ROSS, Robert, Stoker 2c, 69119 (SANF), SS Laconia, 1 October 1942, ship loss (Victory, O/P), DOWS

RUITERS, Walter, Stoker, CN/ 72081 (SANF), SANF, 21 July 1942, died

RYALL, David R, Able Seaman, 69999 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

 

SALCOMBE, Francis R, Stoker 1c, 58589 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

SCHILDER, R (initial only) D, Leading Seaman, CN 71826 V (SANF), SANF, 2 December 1945, died

SCOTT, Clifford, Ordinary Telegraphist, 66973 (SANF), Jaguar, 26 March 1942, ship loss, MPK

SCOTT, William J, Able Seaman, 68007 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

SEVEL, Harry, Stoker 1c, 68100 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

SHIELDS, Eric E M, Lieutenant SANF, Pembroke IV, 12 April 1944, died

SHIMMIN, William, Leading Stoker, 69661 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

SIENI, Joseph F, Able Seaman, 69788 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

SIMON, Frederick, Stoker, CN/ 72046 V (SANF), SANF, 8 May 1945, died

SLATER, Bryan M, Able Seaman, 67358 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

SMITH, Ian R, Electrical Artificer 4c, 68478 (SANF), Hecla, 12 November 1942, ship loss, MPK

SMITH, Matthew S, Able Seaman, 67359 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

SMITH, P (initial only), Able Seaman, CN/ 72263 (SANF), SANF, 7 April 1942, died

SNELL, Harold W, Leading Telegraphist, 69827 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

SONDERUP, Arthur W, Able Seaman, 67356 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

SPENCE, Noel W, Ordinary Seaman, RNVR, 68732 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

SQUIRES, John E, Ordinary Seaman, RNVR, 68728 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

ST CLAIR-WHICKER, Willie H, Able Seaman, 67292 (SANF), SANF, 21 September 1941, died

STADLANDER, Rowland C, Stoker 1c, 67400 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

STANLEY, Gordon J, Able Seaman, 66963 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

STAPELBERG, Willem J, Steward, 562221 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

STEELE, Ewen, Able Seaman, 71272 V (SANF), Southern Sea (SANF), 5 October 1943, killed

STEPHEN, Eric B, Ordinary Seaman, RNVR, 68861 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

STOKOE, Cyril A M, Act/Leading Seaman, 67264 V (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

SUTTON, Donald A, Able Seaman, 70426 (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

SUTTON, George A M, Leading Seaman, 586403 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

SWANEPOEL, S (initial only), Cook, 7112 (SANF), SANF, 21 July 1946, died

SWANN, Lawrence T, Stoker 1c, RNVR, 68710 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

SYMONS, Maurice M, Able Seaman, 68245 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

 

THOMPSON, Walter E H, Able Seaman, 67360 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

THOMPSON, J (initial only) R, Stoker, 330669 (SANF), SANF, 18 August 1947, died

THORP, Edward C, Signalman, 67852 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

THORPE, Francis D, Able Seaman, 67462 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

THORPE, Maurice, Stoker 2c, RNVR, 69140 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

TITUS, J (initial only) J, Able Seaman, CN/ 584418 V (SANF), SANF, 9 April 1947, died

TOMS, Ivanhoe S, Able Seaman, 67709 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

TRAFFORD, William O, Able Seaman, 71222 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

TREAMER, Arthur P, Petty Officer, 71109 (SANF), Parktown (SANF), 21 June 1942, ship loss, MPK

TREISMAN, Gerald, Steward, 584730 V (SANF), SANF, 10 February 1945, died

TROUT, A (initial only) N, Able Seaman, CN/ 72133 (SANF), Stork, 4 August 1942, died

TURNER, N (initial only) J, Able Seaman, CN/ 562915 (SANF), SANF, 11 December 1945, died

 

UNSWORTH, Owen P (also known as R K Jevon), Ordinary Seaman, 69089 (SANF), Barham, 25 November 1941, ship loss, MPK

 

VAN AARDT, S (initial only), Stoker, CN/ 721490 (SANF), SANF, 22 May 1945, died

VAN DORDRECHT, William H, Able Seaman, 67851 (SANF), Edinburgh, 30 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

VAN DYK, Cecil H, Able Seaman, 67404 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

VAN GRAAN, A (initial only), Able Seaman, CNN/ 957 (SANF), SANF, 10 July 1946, died

VAN NOIE, Norman, Able Seaman, CN/ 72134 (SANF), SANF, 20 September 1941, died

VAN WYNGAARDT, F (initial only) A, Able Seaman, 585610 V (SANF), SANF, 21 July 1945, died

VERSFELD, Peter H S, Able Seaman, RNVR, 68859 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

VICKERS, Colin P, Able Seaman, 68296 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

VILJOEN, Dennis A, Telegraphist, 70984 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

VINK, Benjamin F, Ordinary Seaman, RNVR, 68860 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

VORSTER, Jack P, Able Seaman, 67755 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

 

WAKE, Vivian H, Ty/Lieutenant (A) SANF, 815 Sqn Landrail, 28 March 1945, air crash, MPK

WALTON, Dudley N, Sub Lieutenant SANF, Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

WATSON, George, Lieutenant SANF, SANF, 15 October 1944, died

WEBBER, Reginald, Able Seaman, 67361 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

WELCOME, J (initial only) J, Able Seaman, CN/ 72270 (SANF), SANF, 19 July 1945, died

WESTON, Grant E, Ordinary Seaman, RNVR, 68498 (SANF), Phoebe, 27 August 1941, torpedoed, killed

WHITE, Charles W, Petty Officer, 562200 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

WHITE, Edward G, Stoker, 68026 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

WHYMARK, Vivian G, Ordinary Seaman, 69024 (SANF), Barham, 25 November 1941, ship loss, MPK

WIBLIN, Eric R, Able Seaman, 67717 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

WILD, Ernest A, Able Seaman, 67929 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

WILLETT, Amos A S, Stoker 1c, 67240 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

WILLIAMS, Dastrey S, Leading Seaman, 67047 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

WILLIAMSON, Walter N, Able Seaman, 67803 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

WILLSON, Gerald F, Stoker 2c, RNVR, 69006 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

WRIGHT, Gerald V, Act/Ordnance Artificer 4, 67375 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

WRIGHT, Thomas H, Able Seaman, RNVR, 68039 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

WULFF, Emil F, Leading Seaman, 562466 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

 

YATES, Philip R, Supply Assistant, 67570 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

South Africans on HMS Dorsetshire and HMS Cornwall

Cruisers HMS Cornwall and  HMS Dorsetshire were sunk near Ceylon on the 5th April 1942 by Japanese bombs.

Many South Africans served on board and 39 of them lost their lives as a result of the sinking.

HMS Dorsetshire
HMS Dorsetshire

Stoker 1st Class Douglas Stewart BELL

Stoker 2nd Class Alexander Morrison BRUCE

Stoker 1st Class Albert EVENEPOEL

Stoker 1st Class Sender GEFFEN

Ordinary Seaman Horace George HOWE

Stoker 1st Class George KENDRICK

Able Seaman Norman Glen McINTYRE

Ordinary Telegraphist Robert McLELLAN

Able Seaman Laurence Victor MILNE

Able Seaman Douglas Edward MORROW

Able Seaman Charles Percy ORTON

Leading Stoker Roland Aylmer REDMAN

Able Seaman William John SCOTT

Stoker 1st Class Harry SEVEL

Stoker 1st Class Amos Alfred Sidney WILLETT

Able Seaman Walter Noel WILLIAMSON

HMS Cornwall
HMS Cornwall

Ordinary Seaman Hedley Crossman BESWETHERICK

 Stoker 2nd Class  John Stephen BOTES

Able Seaman  Noel Patrick COMMERFORD

 Engine Room Artificer 4th Class Cecil Edmund CRAWFORD

 Able Seaman  Charles Patrick Henegan DU PREEZ

Stoker 2nd Class  Charles Cecil William Peter DUTTON

Able Seaman  Raymond Frederick HANSLO

Able Seaman Kenneth Ian Blair KEITH

Able Seaman  Graeme Alexander Bruce KENYON

Able Seaman  Monty George Walter KIRSTEN

Electrical Artificer 4th Class  Edward Verdun LAW

 Stoker 2nd Class  William Kenneth McDAVID

Stoker 1st Class William Archibald MITCHELL

Able Seaman  Walter Alan PALMER

Ordinary Seaman  Noel William SPENCE

Ordinary Seaman  John Eric SQUIRES

Ordinary Seaman Eric Berkeley STEPHEN

 Stoker 1st Class Lawrence T. SWANN

 Stoker 2nd Class Maurice THORPE

 Able Seaman  Peter Henry Swift VERSFELD

Ordinary Seaman Benjamin François VINK

Stoker 2nd Class Gerald Francis WILLSON

Able Seaman Thomas Henry WRIGHT

 

These men are remembered  on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

Their names can be searched, and a certificate generated, such as this example for Noel Commerford of Cape Town.

We will remember them.

WW2 SA Naval Casualties by Name and Ship

 

CASUALTIES BY DATE and SHIP

Compiled by Don Kindell

 

(for ship information, go to Naval History Homepage and type name in Site Search)

 

 

1 9 3 9

 

4 October 1939

 

South African Naval Force

LUCAS, E (initial only) W R, Chief Engineman, 66756 (SANF), died

 

13 October 1939

 

Disa (SANF)

NICOLSON, Andrew, Cook, 63827 (SANF), died

 

 

1 9 4 0

 

15 April 1940

 

Africana (SANF)

BESTER, A (initial only) T, Leading Stoker, 6640 (SANF), died

 

8 July 1940

 

Gloucester, bombing,

ALLISON, Oswald H, Able Seaman RNVR, 67349 (SANF), killed

NOWLAN, Francis C, Able Seaman RNVR, 67409 (SANF), DOW

 

5 September 1940

 

Cornwall

AINSLIE, Roy, Petty Officer, 66382 (SANF), died

 

 

1 9 4 1

 

11 February 1941

 

Southern Floe (SANF), ship loss

ANDERS, John, Steward, 69637 (SANF), MPK

BOWER, Robert, Stoker 1c, 69935 (SANF), MPK

BRAND, Leslie A, Able Seaman, 69828 (SANF), MPK

CAULFIELD, Patrick, Steward, 69802 (SANF), MPK

CHANDLER, Charles R D, Cook (S), 69613 (SANF), MPK

CHENOWETH, Richard, Stoker 1c, 67420 (SANF), MPK

FAIRLEY, Alexander E, Sub Lieutenant SANF,  MPK

FRIEDLANDER, Cecil A, Able Seaman, 114703 (SANF), MPK

GARDINER, Elliott, Able Seaman, 67260 (SANF), MPK

GREENACRE, John H, Leading Seaman, 69677 (SANF), MPK

HEASMAN, Gratwicke E E, Engine Room Artificer 4c, 69784 (SANF), MPK

HOGG, Roy S, Sub Lieutenant, SANF, MPK

INNES, Ian Mck, Sub Lieutenant, SANF, MPK

MARSH, Reginald H Y, Able Seaman, 69911 (SANF), MPK

MITCHELL, William N, Able Seaman, 69787 (SANF), MPK

NEL, Eloff R, Able Seaman, 69635 (SANF), MPK

NICHOLSON, Douglas O, Able Seaman, 66833 (SANF), MPK

PUGH, John R, Able Seaman, 66877 (SANF), MPK

RYALL, David R, Able Seaman, 69999 (SANF), MPK

SHIMMIN, William, Leading Stoker, 69661 (SANF), MPK

SIENI, Joseph F, Able Seaman, 69788 (SANF), MPK

SNELL, Harold W, Leading Telegraphist, 69827 (SANF), MPK

STANLEY, Gordon J, Able Seaman, 66963 (SANF), MPK

WALTON, Dudley N, Sub Lieutenant, SANF, MPK

 

28 March 1941

 

Director of South African Forces

HALLIFAX, Guy W, Rear Admiral, SANF, accident, killed

 

10 May 1941

 

South African Naval Force

HUGHES, T (initial only) J, Stoker, 71383 (SANF), died

 

Tordonn (SANF)

CASSON, William, Able Seaman, 252935 V (SANF), died

 

21 May 1941

 

Syvern

ANDERSON, Richard W N, Able Seaman, 86082 (SANF), killed

 

22 May 1941

 

Gloucester, ship loss

ANGEL, Walter J H, Able Seaman, 67351 (SANF), MPK

AUSTIN-SMITH, John R, Ordinary Seaman, 67336 (SANF), MPK

BAGSHAW-SMITH, Philip R, Ordinary Seaman, 67337 (SANF), MPK

BAGSHAWE-SMITH, Sydney Q, Able Seaman, 68454 (SANF), MPK

BARBER, Edgar F, Able Seaman, 67302 (SANF), MPK

BRUCE, John, Able Seaman, 67355 (SANF), MPK

CARTER, Frederick G, Able Seaman, 67345 (SANF), MPK

CHILTON, Ronald H D, Ordinary Seaman, 67335 (SANF), MPK

EDWARDS, Ronald E, Ordinary Seaman, 67384 (SANF), MPK

ELLIOT, Edward R, Leading Seaman, 66584 (SANF), MPK

GERAGHTY, Herbert C, Able Seaman, 67338 (SANF), MPK

GROGAN, Graham B, Able Seaman, 67343 (SANF), MPK

JAMES, Victor F, Ordinary Seaman, 67303 (SANF), MPK

JENSEN, Niels P, Able Seaman, 67347 (SANF), MPK

MCCARTHY, Henry F, Ordinary Seaman, 67223 (SANF), MPK

MOORE, Albert, Able Seaman, 67416 (SANF), MPK

SLATER, Bryan M, Able Seaman, 67358 (SANF), MPK

SMITH, Matthew S, Able Seaman, 67359 (SANF), MPK

SONDERUP, Arthur W, Able Seaman, 67356 (SANF), MPK

STADLANDER, Rowland C, Stoker 1c, 67400 (SANF), MPK

STOKOE, Cyril A M, Act/Leading Seaman, 67264 V (SANF), MPK

SYMONS, Maurice M, Able Seaman, 68245 (SANF), MPK

THOMPSON, Walter E H, Able Seaman, 67360 (SANF), MPK

VAN DYK, Cecil H, Able Seaman, 67404 (SANF), MPK

WEBBER, Reginald, Able Seaman, 67361 (SANF), MPK

WILLIAMS, Dastrey S, Leading Seaman, 67047 (SANF), MPK

WRIGHT, Gerald V, Act/Ordnance Artificer 4, 67375 (SANF), MPK

 

3 June 1941

 

Southern Maid (SANF)

HOLT, Albert E, Telegraphist, 69576 (SANF), killed

 

4 August 1941

 

SS Tunisia, ship loss

ADAMS, Douglas E H, Act/Able Seaman RNVR, 66378 (SANF), (President III, O/P), MPK

 

27 August 1941

 

Phoebe, torpedoed

WESTON, Grant E, Ordinary Seaman RNVR, 68498 (SANF), killed

 

20 September 1941

 

South African Naval Force

VAN NOIE, Norman, Able Seaman, CN/72134 (SANF), died

 

21 September 1941

 

South African Naval Force

ST CLAIR-WHICKER, Willie H, Able Seaman, 67292 (SANF), died

 

24 November 1941

 

Dunedin, ship loss

RASMUSSEN, Victor J S, Leading Telegraphist, 66920 (SANF), MPK

 

25 November 1941

 

Barham, ship loss

BAKER, Dennis E W, Ordinary Seaman, 68617 (SANF), MPK

GLENN, Paul V, Ordinary Seaman, 68906 (SANF), DOW

HAYES, Richard T, Ordinary Seaman, 68499 (SANF), MPK

MORRIS, Cyril D, Ordinary Seaman, 68932 (SANF), MPK

UNSWORTH, Owen P (also known as R K Jevon), Ordinary Seaman, 69089 (SANF), MPK

WHYMARK, Vivian G, Ordinary Seaman, 69024 (SANF), MPK

 

10 December 1941

 

Repulse, ship loss

ADAMSON, William D, Ordinary Seaman RNVR, 69001 (SANF), MPK

 

19 December 1941

 

 

Neptune, ship loss (above – CyberHeritage)

ADAMS, Thomas A, Able Seaman, 67953 (SANF), MPK

CALDER, Frank T, Ordinary Seaman, 67971 (SANF), MPK

CAMPBELL, Roy M, Able Seaman, 67318 (SANF), MPK

DIXON, Serfas, Able Seaman, 67743 (SANF), MPK

FEW, Jim, Able Seaman, 67744 (SANF), MPK

HAINES, Eric G, Able Seaman, 67697 (SANF), MPK

HOOK, Aubrey C, Able Seaman, 67862 (SANF), MPK

HOWARD, Harold D, Signalman, 67289 (SANF), MPK

HUBBARD, Wallace S, Able Seaman, 67960 (SANF), MPK

KEMACK, Brian N, Signalman, 67883 (SANF), MPK

MERRYWEATHER, John, Able Seaman, 67952 (SANF), MPK

MEYRICK, Walter, Ordinary Signalman, 68155 (SANF), MPK

MORRIS, Rodney, Ordinary Signalman, 68596 (SANF), MPK

RANKIN, Cecil R, Signalman, 67879 (SANF), MPK

THORP, Edward C, Signalman, 67852 (SANF), MPK

THORPE, Francis D, Able Seaman, 67462 (SANF), MPK

WILD, Ernest A, Able Seaman, 67929 (SANF), MPK

 

 

1 9 4 2

 

5 January 1942

 

Carnarvon Castle

BECKER, Stanley H, Able Seaman, 67474 (SANF), road accident, killed

 

29 January 1942

 

Sotra, ship loss

DRURY, Frederick, Ordinary Seaman, 68315 (SANF), MPK

 

25 February 1942

 

ST La Carriere, ship loss

DORE, Frank B, Act/Able Seaman RNVR, 67218 (SANF), (President III, O/P), MPK

 

4 March 1942

 

Cornwall, illness

HAWKINS, Reginald D, Able Seaman, 66700 (SANF), died

 

26 March 1942

 

Jaguar, ship loss

SCOTT, Clifford, Ordinary Telegraphist, 66973 (SANF), MPK

 

5 April 1942

 

Cornwall, ship loss

BATES, John S, Stoker 2c, 68924 (SANF), MPK

BESWETHERICK, Hedley C, Ordinary Seaman RNVR, 86671 (SANF), MPK

BOTES, John S, Stoker 2c RNVR, 68924 (SANF), MPK

COMMERFORD, Noel P, Able Seaman RNVR, 66493 (SANF), MPK

CRAWFORD, Cecil E, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c RNVR, 67922 (SANF), MPK

DU PREEZ, Charles P H, Able Seaman, 68175 (SANF), MPK

DUTTON, Charles C, Stoker 2c RNVR, 68949 (SANF), MPK

HANSLO, Raymond F, Able Seaman RNVR, 68295 (SANF), MPK

KEITH, Kenneth I B, Able Seaman RNVR, 66742 (SANF), MPK

KENYON, Graeme A B, Able Seaman RNVR, 68002 (SANF), MPK

KIRSTEN, Monty G W, Able Seaman RNVR, 68917 (SANF), MPK

LAW, Edward, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c RNVR, 66760 (SANF), MPK

MCDAVID, William K, Stoker 2c RNVR, 69138 (SANF), MPK

MITCHELL, William A, Stoker 1c RNVR, 68796 (SANF), MPK

SPENCE, Noel W, Ordinary Seaman RNVR, 68732 (SANF), MPK

SQUIRES, John E, Ordinary Seaman RNVR, 68728 (SANF), MPK

STEPHEN, Eric B, Ordinary Seaman RNVR, 68861 (SANF), MPK

SWANN, Lawrence T, Stoker 1c RNVR, 68710 (SANF), MPK

THORPE, Maurice, Stoker 2c RNVR, 69140 (SANF), MPK

VERSFELD, Peter H S, Able Seaman RNVR, 68859 (SANF), MPK

VINK, Benjamin F, Ordinary Seaman RNVR, 68860 (SANF), MPK

WILLSON, Gerald F, Stoker 2c RNVR, 69006 (SANF), MPK

WRIGHT, Thomas H, Able Seaman RNVR, 68039 (SANF), MPK

 

Dorsetshire, ship loss

BELL, Douglas S, Ty/Act/Leading Stoker, 67243 (SANF), MPK

BRUCE, Alexander M, Stoker 2c, 67907 (SANF), MPK

EVENPOEL, Albert, Stoker 2c, 67909 (SANF), MPK

GEFFEN, Sender, Stoker 1c, 68035 (SANF), MPK

HOWE, Horace G, Ordinary Seaman RNVR, 68680 (SANF), MPK

KENDRICK, George, Stoker 2c, 67910 (SANF), MPK

MCINTYRE, Norman G, Able Seaman, 67446 (SANF), MPK

MCLELLAN, Robert, Ordinary Telegraphist, 67897 (SANF), MPK

MORROW, Douglas E, Able Seaman, 67989 (SANF), MPK

ORTON, Charles P, Able Seaman, 68009 (SANF), MPK

REDMAN, Roland A, Leading Stoker, 67406 (SANF), MPK

SCOTT, William J, Able Seaman, 68007 (SANF), MPK

SEVEL, Harry, Stoker 1c, 68100 (SANF), MPK

WILLETT, Amos A S, Stoker 1c, 67240 (SANF), MPK

WILLIAMSON, Walter N, Able Seaman, 67803 (SANF), MPK

 

6 April 1942

 

Cornwall, ship loss

PALMER, Walter A, Able Seaman RNVR, 68344 (SANF), (rescued, aboard HMS Enterprise), DOW

 

7 April 1942

 

South African Naval Force

SMITH, P (initial only), Able Seaman, CN/72263 (SANF), died

 

9 April 1942

 

 

Hermes, ship loss (above, prewar – Navy Photos)

BRYSON, Neil W, Ordinary Telegraphist, 69147 (SANF), MPK

BURNIE, Ian A, Able Seaman, 67786 (SANF), MPK

CLAYTON, Frederick H, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, 68102 (SANF), MPK

DE CASTRO, Alfred T, Stoker 1c, 67914 (SANF), MPK

KEENEY, Frederick W, Able Seaman, 67748 (SANF), MPK

KEYTEL, Roy, Able Seaman, 67296 (SANF), MPK

KIMBLE, Dennis C, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, 67600 (SANF), MPK

KRAUSE, Frederick E, Able Seaman, 68321 (SANF), MPK

RAPHAEL, Philip R, Able Seaman, 67841 (SANF), MPK

RICHARDSON, Ronald P, Able Seaman, 67494 (SANF), MPK

TOMS, Ivanhoe S, Able Seaman, 67709 (SANF), MPK

VICKERS, Colin P, Able Seaman, 68296 (SANF), MPK

VORSTER, Jack P, Able Seaman, 67755 (SANF), MPK

WHITE, Edward G, Stoker, 68026 (SANF), MPK

WIBLIN, Eric R, Able Seaman, 67717 (SANF), MPK

YATES, Philip R, Supply Assistant, 67570 (SANF), MPK

 

Hollyhock, ship loss

ANDERSON, Henry G, Able Seaman, 67501 (SANF), MPK

BASTON, Douglas T, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, 68600 (SANF), MPK

BUITENDACH, James M, Stoker 2c, 69223 (SANF), MPK

JUBY, Kenneth J, Ordinary Seaman, 69211 (SANF), MPK

LEACH, Peter A D H, Stoker 2c, 69225 (SANF), MPK

 

20 April 1942

 

Birmingham

BUCHANAN, Alexander, Able Seaman, 67934 (SANF), died

 

30 April 1942

 

Edinburgh, ship loss

DRUMMOND, Valentine W, Able Seaman, 68043 (SANF), MPK

VAN DORDRECHT, William H, Able Seaman, 67851 (SANF), MPK

 

21 June 1942

 

Express

COMMERFORD, Terence, Ordinary Seaman, 330258 (SANF), died

 

Parktown (SANF), ship loss

BROCKLEHURST, Peter S, Able Seaman, 70457 (SANF), MPK

COOK, John A, Stoker 1c, 70256 (SANF), MPK

JAGGER, Leslie J, Lieutenant SANF, 70016 (SANF), MPK

MCEWAN, William A, Steward, 69686 (SANF), MPK

TREAMER, Arthur P, Petty Officer, 71109 (SANF), MPK

 

6 July 1942

 

Niger, ship loss

PRICE, David, Able Seaman RNVR, P/68529 (SANF), MPK

 

21 July 1942

 

South African Naval Force

RUITERS, Walter, Stoker, CN/72081 (SANF), died

 

4 August 1942

 

Stork

TROUT, A (initial only) N, Able Seaman, CN/72133 (SANF), died

 

16 August 1942

 

South African Naval Force

MURPHY, J (initial only), Able Seaman, CN/72256 (SANF), died

 

17 August 1942

 

Receiffe (SANF)

FROST, M (initial only) L, Able Seaman, CN/71804 (SANF), died

 

18 August 1942

 

Birmingham

JOHNSTONE, Henry N, Lieutenant Commander (E), SANF, 66727, died

 

4 September 1942

 

South African Naval Force

PETERSON, W (initial only) J, Able Seaman, CN/72184 (SANF), died

 

16 September 1942

 

Orion

BAWDEN, Wilfred R, Stoker 2c RNVR, 330425 (SANF), DOWS

 

25 September 1942

 

Roodepoort (SANF)

REHR, Cecil, Able Seaman, 69877 (SANF), died

 

29 September 1942

 

Soetvlei (SANF)

CARLELSE, Frederick, Able Seaman, CN/72004 (SANF), died

 

1 October 1942

 

SS Laconia, ship loss

ROSS, Robert, Stoker 2c, 69119 (SANF), (Victory, O/P), DOWS

 

2 November 1942

 

SS Llandilo, ship loss

CRAGG, Ronald F, Able Seaman (DEMS), 66488 (SANF), (President III, O/P), MPK

 

12 November 1942

 

Hecla, ship loss,

BENNETT, John F, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, 330351 (SANF), MPK

LLOYD, George H, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, 330353 (SANF), MPK

PEERS, Charles V, Able Seaman, 562653 (SANF), MPK

SMITH, Ian R, Electrical Artificer 4c, 68478 (SANF), MPK

 

7 December 1942

 

SS Ceramic, ship loss

MOSCOS, John G, Leading Writer, 66786 (SANF), (SANF, O/P), MPK

 

30 December 1942

 

Fidelity, ship loss

NIGHTSCALES, Norman, Writer, 68148 (SANF), MPK

 

 

1 9 4 3

 

3 January 1943

 

South African Naval Force

PETERS, Norman, Leading Stoker, 66847 (SANF), died

 

27 January 1943

 

Assegai

GITTINS, Victor L, Ordinary Seaman, 69325 (SANF), died

 

26 February 1943

 

President III

PLATT, Ronald M, Petty Officer, 67160 V (SANF), accident, killed

 

7 March 1943

 

Saunders

CROSSLEY, Alfred H, Sub Lieutenant, SANF, MPK

DE KOCK, Victor P De C, Ty/Lieutenant, SANF, MPK

 

13 March 1943

 

SS Empress of Canada, ship loss

COCHRANE, Joseph, Engine Room Artificer 3c, P 68947 (SANF), (Pembroke, O/P), MPK

 

24 March 1943

 

Adriat (SANF)

DELL, Rodney, Able Seaman, 68866 (SANF), killed

 

1 April 1943

 

SANF, Benghazi, Libya

HENDERSON, Alexander P, Chief Engine Room Artificer, 562099 (SANF), killed

 

9 May 1943

 

Gonding (SANF)

JAMES, H (initial only), Steward, CN/72252 (SANF), died

 

14 May 1943

 

South African Naval Force

ORGILL, C (initial only) B, Able Seaman, CN/71947 (SANF), died

 

20 May 1943

 

South African Naval Force

LA CHARD, Edwin, Lieutenant Commander, SANF, died

 

28 May 1943

 

South African Naval Force

LUCAS, A (initial only) W, Able Seaman, 152875 (SANF), died

 

30 June 1943

 

South African Naval Force

BATEMAN, T (initial only), Chief Engine Room Artificer, 71627 (SANF), died

 

1 July 1943

 

South African Naval Force

ROBBERTS, Kaspar, Petty Officer, P/5285 (SANF), died

 

15 July 1943

 

SS Empire Lake, ship loss

FLINT, John M, Act/Able Seaman (DEMS), P 562749 (SANF), (President III, O/P), MPK

 

10 August 1943

 

Blaauwberg (SANF)

BOSHOFF, Christofel J, Able Seaman, 70339 (SANF), killed

 

29 August 1943

 

South African Naval Force

LENZ, William, Able Seaman, 69544 (SANF), died

 

21 September 1943

 

SANF, Diego Suarez

BESTEL, Emmanuel A N M, Lieutenant, SANF, died

 

3 October 1943

 

South African Naval Force

HARLE, Paul A, Petty Officer, 71796 (SANF), died

 

5 October 1943

 

Southern Sea (SANF)

STEELE, Ewen, Able Seaman, 71272 V (SANF), killed

 

18 November 1943

 

South African Naval Force

BETTS, Robert, Able Seaman, 68900 (SANF), died

 

29 November 1943

 

South African Naval Force

PAGE, Robert, Sub Lieutenant, SANF, died

 

Smalvlei (SANF)

MCLEAN, Richard, Stoker, 562567 (SANF), died

 

2 December 1943

 

Stork

LOUW, Joseph, Stoker, CN 72175 (SANF), illness, died

 

16 December 1943

 

South African Naval Force

HARRIS, R (initial only) H, Telegraphist, 330488 (SANF), died

 

19 December 1943

 

South African Naval Force

NICHOLLS, John, Yeoman of Signals, 66824 V (SANF), died

 

 

1 9 4 4

 

18 January 1944

 

South African Naval Force

FLORENCE, John, Stoker, CN/71982 V (SANF), died

 

26 January 1944

 

Northern Duke

ATKIN, William B, Lieutenant SANF, illness, died

 

28 January 1944

 

South African Naval Force

DANIELS, Adam, Stoker, 72034 (SANF), died

 

31 March 1944

 

South African Naval Force

RAVENS, Albert, Able Seaman, CN/72213 V (SANF), died

 

12 April 1944

 

Pembroke IV

SHIELDS, Eric E M, Lieutenant, SANF, died

 

14 April 1944

 

851 Sqn Shah, air crash

MACWHIRTER, Cecil J, Ty/Sub Lieutenant (A), SANF, MPK

 

4 May 1944

 

South African Naval Force

DE KLERK, John, Ordinary Seaman, 585868 V (SANF), died

 

8 May 1944

 

South African Naval Force

BOTHA, Herkulas, Cook, 562093 V (SANF), died

 

16 June 1944

 

South African Naval Force

BISSETT, Alexander, Lieutenant, SANF, died

 

 

14 September 1944

 

South African Naval Force

JENKINS, Edward G, Engine Room Artificer, 66720 V (SANF), died

 

20 September 1944

 

South African Naval Force

KEMP, Thomas, Able Seaman, CN/71015 V (SANF), died

 

15 October 1944

 

South African Naval Force

WATSON, George, Lieutenant, SANF, died

 

14 November 1944

 

Treern (SANF)

BOSWELL, Louis F W, Chief Engine Room Artificer, 69756V (SANF), MPK

 

19 November 1944

 

South African Naval Force

ABRAHAMS, Henry, Able Seaman, CN/719204 (SANF), died

 

22 November 1944

 

South African Naval Force

BERMAN, Nicholas, Ordinary Seaman, 616728V (SANF), died

 

 

1 9 4 5

 

4 January 1945

 

ML.1163, ship loss

HOWDEN, Russell K, Ty/Sub Lieutenant, SANF, MPK

 

11 January 1945

 

South African Naval Force

DIXON, Robert, Able Seaman, CN/584276 (SANF), died

 

12 January 1945

 

Treern (SANF), ship loss

ANDERSON, Robert D, Engine Room Artificer 2c, 71067 V (SANF), MPK

BARKER, Ronald E, Sub Lieutenant, SANF, MPK

BLAKE, Robert E, Petty Officer, P 6572 (SANF), MPK

BROWN, Ian H, Able Seaman, 71719 V (SANF), MPK

BYRNE, Patrick, Lieutenant, SANF, MPK

DAVIE, William, Stoker 1c, 70681 V (SANF), MPK

ENGELBEEN, Leslie C, Able Seaman, 562235 V (SANF), MPK

JACOBZ, Frank H, Stoker 1c, 70374 V (SANF), MPK

MATTHEWS, George A, Stoker 1c, 70728 V (SANF), MPK

MCINTYRE, William G, Cook (S), 585360 (SANF), MPK

MCLARTY, William D, Leading Stoker, 562246 V (SANF), MPK

MCLEAN, Godfrey, Able Seaman, 562455 V (SANF), MPK

NILAND, St John E, Able Seaman, 209905 (SANF), MPK

PERRY, Desmond A, Petty Officer, 71211 (SANF), MPK

REID, Kenneth H, Signalman, 562143 V (SANF), MPK

SALCOMBE, Francis R, Stoker 1c, 58589 V (SANF), MPK

STAPELBERG, Willem J, Steward, 562221 V (SANF), MPK

SUTTON, Donald A, Able Seaman, 70426 (SANF), MPK

SUTTON, George A M, Leading Seaman, 586403 V (SANF), MPK

TRAFFORD, William O, Able Seaman, 71222 V (SANF), MPK

VILJOEN, Dennis A, Telegraphist, 70984 V (SANF), MPK

WHITE, Charles W, Petty Officer, 562200 V (SANF), MPK

WULFF, Emil F, Leading Seaman, 562466 V (SANF), MPK

 

10 February 1945

 

South African Naval Force

TREISMAN, Gerald, Steward, 584730 V (SANF), died

 

24 February 1945

 

South African Naval Force

LAMONT, J (initial only), Steward, 71402 (SANF), died

 

28 March 1945

 

815 Sqn Landrail, air crash

WAKE, Vivian H, Ty/Lieutenant (A), SANF, MPK

 

31 March 1945

 

South African Naval Force

HORNE, P (initial only) D, Chief Petty Officer, 66661 V (SANF), died

POVEY, Leonard, Able Seaman, 71182 V (SANF), died

 

20 April 1945

 

South African Naval Force

PFAFF, C (initial only) E, Petty Officer Stoker, 562721 V (SANF), died

 

5 May 1945

 

South African Naval Force

CHRISTIAN, J (initial only) W, Able Seaman, CN/71965 (SANF), died

 

8 May 1945

 

South African Naval Force

SIMON, Frederick, Stoker, CN/72046 V (SANF), died

 

22 May 1945

 

South African Naval Force

VAN AARDT, S (initial only), Stoker, CN/721490 (SANF), died

 

3 June 1945

 

South African Naval Force

CLARE, Frederick W, Chief Petty Officer, 69599 V (SANF), died

 

9 June 1945

 

South African Naval Force

KEOWN, R (initial only) J, Able Seaman, CN/71845 (SANF), died

 

19 July 1945

 

South African Naval Force

WELCOME, J (initial only) J, Able Seaman, CN/72270 (SANF), died

 

21 July 1945

 

South African Naval Force

VAN WYNGAARDT, F (initial only) A, Able Seaman, 585610 V (SANF), died

 

24 July 1945

 

Adamant

CLARKE, Reginald E, Ty/Lieutenant Commander, SANF, air crash, MPK

 

28 July 1945

 

1772 Sqn Indefatigable, air operations

LA GRANGE, Antony M, Sub Lieutenant (A), SANF, MPK

 

8 August 1945

 

Barbrake

LIDDLE, John, Lieutenant, SANF, MPK

 

 

 

Goede Hoop or Good Hope (SANF) (above – Photo Ships)

HEARD, George A, Lieutenant, SANF, died

 

South African Naval Force

COOK, W (initial only), Leading Stoker, 70527 V (SANF), died

 

14 September 1945

 

South African Naval Force

KERSTOFFEL, H (initial only), Stoker, 72310 (SANF), died

 

4 October 1945

 

South African Naval Force

JANSEN, S (initial only) C, Able Seaman, CN/584477 V (SANF), died

 

8 November 1945

 

South African Naval Force

PITTS, S (initial only) L, Able Seaman, CN/564203 (SANF), died

 

2 December 1945

 

South African Naval Force

SCHILDER, R (initial only) D, Leading Seaman, CN 71826 V (SANF), died

 

8 December 1945

 

South African Naval Force

BOTHA, J (initial only) F, Able Seaman, 585386 (SANF), died

 

11 December 1945

 

South African Naval Force

TURNER, N (initial only) J, Able Seaman, CN/562915 (SANF), died

 

 

1 9 4 6

 

20 February 1946

 

South African Naval Force

KEMERY, S (initial only) P, Leading Writer, 67275 (SANF), died

 

25 February 1946

 

Copra

BARBER, Benjamin W R, Sub Lieutenant, SANF, died

 

4 May 1946

 

South African Naval Force

KEET, H (initial only) M T, Able Seaman, 586028 (SANF), died

 

5 May 1946

 

South African Naval Force

FLANAGAN, Terrence D, Able Seaman, 587088 (SANF), died

 

14 May 1946

 

South African Naval Force

ISAACS, N (initial only), Able Seaman, CN/584368 V (SANF), died

 

8 June 1946

 

South African Naval Force

FULLFORD, Watton, Chief Petty Officer, 69711 (SANF), died

 

28 June 1946

 

South African Naval Force

NORTMAN, Willem, Stoker, 590608 V (SANF), died

 

10 July 1946

 

South African Naval Force

VAN GRAAN, A (initial only), Able Seaman, CNN/957 (SANF), died

 

21 July 1946

 

South African Naval Force

SWANEPOEL, S (initial only), Cook, 7112 (SANF), died

 

17 October 1946

 

South African Naval Force

DICKSON, M (initial only) A, Sub Lieutenant, SANF

Died

 

14 November 1946

 

South African Naval Force

OLLERHEAD, Owen, Lieutenant, SANF, died

 

29 December 1946

 

Goede Hoop (SANF)

GILBRIDE, Charles S, Lieutenant (Sp), SANF, died

 

 

1 9 4 7

 

9 April 1947

 

South African Naval Force

TITUS, J (initial only) J, Able Seaman, CN/584418 V (SANF), died

 

7 June 1947

 

South African Naval Force

POGGENPOEL, D (Inital Only) B, Able Seaman, CN/71950 V (SANF), died

 

27 June 1947

 

South African Naval Force

KONIG, E (initial only), Stoker, 584989 V (SANF), died

 

18 August 1947

 

South African Naval Force

THOMPSON, J (initial only) R, Stoker, 330669 (SANF), died

Advance Notice – Books

Courtesy of Chris Bennett

 

ADVANCE NOTICE – BOOKS

To avoid having a percentage linked increase in the current subscriptions (R0?), we have to accept the odd commercial opportunity and thus advise all readers of the imminent release in South Africa of two naval/maritime linked non-fiction publications that may well be suitable ‘Christmas’ or whatever helps empty a bonus filled wallet in December, gifts.

 

san-badges

South African Naval and Maritime Badges and Insignia

 

Many years of research by Alex Rice, a leading collector of insignia and Merchant Marine Engineer, has resulted in his unique book with over 1 300 illustrations. Published privately and with only 200 books produced, this unique publication will be a great reference for anyone interested in maritime heraldry and history. Availability and cost are still to be confirmed but should be available from the writer in Durban or in Cape Town at a discounted price or through selected book sellers (to their profit). Further details will be published but interest can be registered by return email which will be forwarded.

 

Iron Fist from the Sea

Five years of research and interviews have finally paid off and this history of the 47 Top Secret clandestine Maritime Operations conducted by Special Force, most with the SA Navy, during the so-called Border War, was released in the UK last week. It is due in SA this week with over 200 of the 300 available already ordered. Distributed by Peter Hyde & Associates for Helion Books, It can be ordered from most big book shops. Due to import duties and shipping costs, it is, however, fairly costly. These operations included the sinking of seven vessels in ‘enemy’ ports and includes the full story of most major operations with input from Russian advisers and, in the case of ARGON when Wynand du Toit was captured, the story from the Angolan side. Further details available by ‘googling’ the title and publisher.

 

 

iron-fist

 

Iron Fist from the Sea -South Africa’s Seaborne Raiders: 1978-1988

 

By Douw Steyn and Arnè Söderlund

 

 

450 pages, 208 000 words, This seminal work documents the clandestine seaborne operations undertaken by South Africa’s 4 Reconnaissance Commando Regiment. It breathtakingly reveals the versatility and effectiveness of this elite unit which worked with a range of other South African and Rhodesian forces, including the Rhodesian SAS, to engage in a range of raiding and war fighting activities.

 

These operations saw the clandestine reconnaissance of harbours, the sinking of enemy shipping and the destruction of shore installations in Angola and Mozambique. Just some of the tasks undertaken by this extraordinary maritime capability which totalled no more than 45 operators, both black and white!

 

With unparalleled access to previously secret material, the authors, both of whom worked to develop 4 Recce’s operating capabilities, trace the origins of the Regiment back to the 1970’s when the South Africans determined the need for a maritime force projection capability. They relate how maritime doctrine was developed within South Africa’s wider Special Forces capability and how joint operational approaches were configured with the South African Navy.

 

This saw the development of a range of swimmer, reconnaissance, diving and boat operator training courses, along with the design of specialist raiding craft and amphibious assault platforms, which were originated to operate from the Navy’s existing shipping and submarines. All of which demonstrated the immense potential of this newly emergent force and the resourcefulness of its individual operators.

 

Required to successfully complete a gruelling selection process, the operators of 4 Recce were relentlessly tested to prove their physical and mental mettle, not to mention their leadership skills and initiative. Steyn and Söderlund’s chronological analysis of the operations undertaken by 4 Recce and the South African Navy is stunning to behold. They impartially detail the secret and specialised actions which saw both success and failure.

 

From Cabinda on the West Coast to Tanzania on the East, 4 Recce, and whose existence and capability was largely kept secret even within the South African Defence Force, conducted numerous clandestine raids. They attacked shipping and strategic targets such as oil facilities, transport infrastructure and even ANC offices. And sometimes the raids did go wrong, spectacularly so in one instance when two operators were killed and Captain Wynand Du Toit was captured. He was later paraded in front of the world’s media, much to the embarrassment of the South African government.

 

This is a fascinating work and one that will enthral anyone with an interest in Special Forces operations.

For further information browse the website of the Naval Heritage Trust.

A Tribute to the Chief of the Navy

A Tribute to the Chief of the Navy


Vice-Admiral Johannes Mudimu CLS, DMG, SM, MMS, MMM, MMB


By
Rear-Admiral Bernhard H. Teuteberg (rtd) SD,SM, MMM


I met the Admiral for the first time when he reported for orientation training (1998) at the SA Naval College in Gordon’s Bay. He had just been selected to transfer from the SA Army to the SA Navy and I was ordered, as the Officer Commanding of this officer training establishment, to provide him with an orientation opportunity that would bridge the difference between the two Services. Since that first meeting we have shared many experiences and challenges, initially, within the newly formed Fleet Command, with him as the first Chief of Staff, and at Naval Headquarters, where I had the honour to serve under his command as the Director Naval Personnel and subsequently, when he became the Chief of the Navy, as his Director Maritime Plans and Chief Director Maritime Strategy. Whilst it is therefore evident that we have shared the last 14 years in the new SA Navy, it must also be remembered that we had integrated into the SANDF, respectively from different and opposing organisations, namely from umKhonto e Sizwe (MK) (Vice-Admiral Mudimu) and the old SADF (me). In my opinion our paths thus reflect the diversity of our South African history, whilst recognising that reconciliation can be achieved when our patriotic duty and loyalty is shared within a single vision of a successful South Africa, and thus SA Navy, that transcends all differences.


“Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak. Courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.” – Winston Churchill


From our first meeting at the SA Naval College in 1998 I realised that I was dealing with a very special officer; an officer who was very intelligent, well read, totally committed to the RSA, the SANDF and to a well-disciplined military organisation. He was extremely inquisitive and wanted to know everything there was to know about the SA Navy. He never gave the impression of knowing everything and in fact set out to learn by listening to all members and employees of the SA Navy. It was clear that he had the courage to speak when it was required, but also to listen when that was required. His positive and constructive attitude later became the corner-stone of his leadership of the transformation process of the newly created Fleet Command. I never found him to ignore a problem, with the hope that it would go away, but always knew that he would speak his mind when a problem required his intervention. It was during this time that he had to deal with many of the problems of the SA Navy Integration Process. We sat trying to resolve many of the issues surrounding the practical problems of integration and subsequently drafted a SA Navy Integration Audit Policy that was presented to General Masondo (Chief of SANDF Integration) in Pretoria. This policy was approved for implementation and led to not only bridging training, in the correct and final musterings, but also to progression training that assisted the individual members in progressing smoothly through the various ranks. I deem this policy to be primarily responsible for an auditable, responsible and acceptable integration process in the SA Navy.


It is however as the Chief of the Navy that I came to know Vice-Admiral Mudimu the best as he steered the ship through some very turbulent times and had to navigate with caution due to the extra-ordinary demands of the time in the history of our organisation.


I believe that the following achievements serve as a monument to the leadership and times of Vice-Admiral Mudimu:


Strategic Defence Packages (SDPs).


The honeymoon was over when Vice-Admiral Mudimu became the Chief of the Navy on the 1 March 2005. The four Valour Class Frigates had been delivered from Germany, the vessels had been commissioned but still had to become operational, including having their combat suites fitted and accepted. The three Type 209 1400; Mod RSA Submarines were in the process of being launched in Germany and had to still be commissioned and brought to the RSA. Whilst his Navy had to obviously deal with the complex process of bringing these new assets into service, it also had to deal with an ageing fleet of ships that had to remain operational. The general notion that the SA Navy Force Design had been completely renewed through the SDP process was obviously flawed and the new ships and submarines brought an imbalance within the fleet; brand new vessels versus very old ships. Furthermore the complex process of vessel integration brought its own challenges; issues such as the Customer Furnished Equipment (CFE) list, codification, shore support infra-structure, limited budget, short-comings in the relatively minimised logistics support provided, training infra-structure, etc made this task immensely difficult. The SA Navy, under the leadership of Vice-Admiral Mudimu, however brought these ships and submarines into service, on time and within budget; indeed a remarkable achievement for a Navy that had been reduced to less than 7 000 people (members and employees), had to operate with a totally inadequate budget and was starting to feel the pressure of operational deployments.


A New Maritime Security Paradigm for Africa.


Whilst the SA Navy was grappling with the reality of new/old ships and submarines, the maritime security challenges on our continent became much more prevalent and visible; especially the threat of piracy, human trafficking, drug smuggling, resources theft, toxic waste dumping, etc. Vice-Admiral Mudimu quickly realised that no single littoral state on the continent could tackle these challenges single-handedly. It required a collective effort. The continent seemed to suffer from a case of sea-blindness and it was thus his vision to create a maritime security awareness and to influence all who would listen to the threats, the requirements and the potential solutions. Under his guidance, and initially in partnership with the Nigerian Navy, the Kenian Navy and the Ghanaian Navy, the Seapower for Africa Symposium was initiated. Thus far three have been held, with two being held in Cape Town. These symposia were obviously based on the example of the International Seapower Symposium, held in Newport, Rhode Island, held every two years, where Vice-Admiral Mudimu represented the RSA with much credibility and enthusiasm. This enthusiasm also led to the SA Navy being invited to attend the opening conference of the Indian Ocean Naval Symposium (IONS), in 2008, in New Delhi, India. The SA Navy presented a paper on cooperation at this symposium and was subsequently requested to host the 2010 IONS Conference. This invitation was declined due to the demands of the FIFA Soccer World Cup 2010 in South Africa. Subsequently Vice-Admiral Mudimu became the Chairman of IONS and the SA Navy hosted an extremely successful conference in Cape Town in 2012. All his efforts also led to the African Union taking notice, and subsequently a task team was appointed to draft the Africa’s Integrated Maritime Strategy 2050 (AIMS-2050) that was adopted in 2013. Furthermore it was clearly understood that strategies will remain just words on a piece of paper if they are not operationalised. In this regard he played a decisive role in the Standing Maritime Committee (SMC) of SADC and was instrumental in an Operational Bi-lateral and Tri-lateral Agreement, initially between The RSA and Mozambique and subsequently, including Tanzania. These agreements have seen the deployment of naval assets into the Mozambique Channel on a near permanent basis.


A Young and Vibrant Personnel Composition of the Navy.


Vice-Admiral Mudimu was absolutely passionate about the youth of our country and this passion was aptly exhibited in his visits to SAS SALDANHA and his personal inter-action with members of the Military Skills Development (MSD) System. His passion sometimes led to him making his personal cellphone number available to parents and learners (to the great consternation of the rest of the Navy leadership) and to a Personnel Budget that remained under threat if the Admiral had anything to do with it. He did however instil a sense of patriotism and a will to succeed in many young people of our country and his legacy is a totally rejuvenated Navy personnel composition that not only reflects the demography of our country, but perhaps as important it has given these young people hope and the opportunity to excel and succeed in an environment which, can sometimes be hostile and only recognises competence; namely the sea! This passion was furthermore evident in his participation in gender, disability and youth summits and conferences. Vice-Admiral Mudimu also had a very charitable side to his make-up and this translated directly into the C Navy Charity Prestige Ball being able to donate nearly R1 000 000 to various charities over the last number of years. The Navy as a whole also became much more community centred and much work was done in orphanages and schools across the country.


The Acceptance of the SA Navy as a Credible Deterrence from the Broader International Naval Community.


Vice-Admiral Mudimu made it clear from the beginning that the SA Navy could only serve as a credible deterrence if it was able to demonstrate its ability to fight at sea. This meant that members of the Navy had to be able to operate all the various capabilities within the Navy when called upon to do so. This was particularly true for exercises within the SADC region, the greater Continent and in fact with all the international Navies that had visited our shores. The SA Navy thus participated in numerous exercises with foreign navies during his time as was seen during Exercises IBSAMAR (Brazil and India), Good Hope (Germany, later including SADC), Oxide (France), Good Tidings (SADC), ATLASUR (Brazil, Argentina & Uruguay), InterOp East/West (SADC/Rest of Africa) and Shared Accord (USA). Every opportunity was used to exercise (Passex) with vessels from foreign vessels rounding the Cape or visiting our shores. All these exercise ensured that our personnel could practice their prowess against Navies as professional as any on this planet. The exercises also gave the SA Navy much confidence that it could in fact operate its own capabilities optimally. The Chief of the Navy further interacted on a continuous basis with the leaders of the Navies in Africa and further afield within the greater international environment. It is my considered opinion that the SA Navy was batting much higher in the batting order of navies than had previously been the case and had become the promoter of foreign policy when abroad. I believe that when the SA Navy formed part of President Zuma’s delegation to Brussels, for the 2012 RSA/EU Summit, it gave recognition to the importance of maritime security and the role that Vice-Admiral Mudimu had played in advocating the role of navies; indeed a very important achievement.


The Introduction of the New Capabilities.


Perhaps not as spectacular as the SDPs the SA Navy did manage to achieve smaller but important milestones during his tenure as Chief of the Navy. In order to cater for these new vessels the electricity reticulation system in the dockyard had to be modernised and rebuilt, the fuel supply system had to be totally upgraded, a new vessel signature measurement and management system had to be introduced, new workboats (small tugs) had to be brought into service, the submarine simulator training system had to be totally renewed, a submarine diving escape simulator was commissioned next to the diving school (first of its kind in the Southern hemisphere), the frigate and submarine test-beds had to be introduced, etc. Furthermore, in a response to a request for assistance within the peace-mission environment from the then CSANDF the Navy created the Maritime Reaction Squadron (MRS). What is perhaps not known, or understood, is that the establishment and fitting-out (Project ZENA) of this new capability was done with additional funds received from Treasury for this purpose and that the running costs of this capability has been made a baseline adjustment to the budget of the SA Navy. The same can be said for the acquisition of the Shallow Water Route Survey System that was acquired in time for the role that the SA Navy played in ensuring the underwater safety of specific ports in the RSA. This system provided the SA Navy with an interim MCM capability, but also gave direction to the technology plans for the future. What must be understood that none of these achievements would have been possible without the thinking, drive, promotion and enthusiasm of the Chief of the Navy.


A Vision for the Future.


The Chief of the Navy, Vice-Admiral Mudimu, very clearly understood that the SA Navy had to look beyond the new frigates and submarines and that in terms of the White Paper on Defence and the Defence Review, new and replacement capabilities had to be planned for and acquired. This vision for a new future thus included patrol vessels, a replacement hydrographic survey platform, a totally rejuvenated and renewed MCM capability, new boats, tenders and tugs, the eventual replacement of the SAS DRAKENSBERG, a Multi Mission Strategic Projection Capability and many others. What perhaps is less known is that all of these capabilities were presented, and accepted to and by, all the various attempts to update and/or rewrite the RSA Defence Review. A testimony to the thinking and credibility of the SA Navy, and thus Vice-Admiral Mudimu, not only within the SANDF but also in the greater Defence family and beyond. I believe his vision for the future of the SA Navy, to be perfectly encapsulated in “The Navy Commander’s Intent”:


“A small, first-class Navy that is respected worldwide as the leading Navy on the Continent of Africa, able and willing to meet all commitments, in terms the Constitution, and thus the intentions of the Commander in Chief, in an effective, efficient and economic manner”


Vice-Admiral Mudimu is well known for his extra-ordinary oratory abilities and could deliver a magnificent speech, inspiring those listening to greater heights, without any preparation or notes. In later years when he was being quoted he however preferred to have a written speech in front of him, but was known to add to the written word, which provided his speeches with much authenticity. This habit then also became the norm for meetings of the Navy Staff/Command Councils; meetings were used not only to advise the Chief on issues but served to educate and involve all members in the various councils. This meant that meetings became very long and the Chief used them to the full in clarifying issues and to create consensus.

Unfortunately, all these achievements, and more, were achieved despite the attempts by a very small minority, who were following their own agendas, and could only seem to achieve something irrelevant through making others fail, in order to minimise the success of our Chief of the Navy. He knew exactly how to deal with these individuals and carried on regardless achieving beyond all expectations. Greatness was however achieved by taking small, but planned and deliberate steps, in the right direction, and with enthusiasm, absolute passion, loyalty, much sacrifice, patriotism, credibility, willpower, fearless and with the eye always on the vision of the SA Navy remaining ‘Unchallenged at Sea”!


I am and was proud to have served during this time and would certainly serve under the Admiral again, in whatever capacity, as I have always trusted his loyalty to the SA Navy, the SANDF and our country.


Vice-Admiral Mudimu is now retiring from the active service of the SANDF and surely there can be no way that this country can and should allow this remarkable individual to disappear into the obscurity of retirement. His contribution to our country has been immeasurable and his abilities are legendary; I am convinced that our country will benefit from his appointment to a higher office in the public service.


In conclusion may I use this opportunity to wish Vice-Admiral Mudimu and his wife, Yvonne, a very happy retirement by recalling an old Gaelic Blessing:
“May the road rise up to meet you.
May the wind be always at your back.
May the sun shine warm upon your face;
the rains fall soft upon your fields and until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm of His hand.”


Hambakahle my Shipmate


HMS Alliance reopens it’s hatches

pkandhmssubHMS Alliance with SAS President Kruger

Britain’s last surviving Second World War
submarine HMS Alliance reopens its hatches after £7m makeover

HMS Alliance – the only British surviving Second World War-era submarine – has reopened its hatches following a major £7m restoration project.

The 281ft sub, based at the Royal Navy Submarine Museum, has been completely restored with new interpretation, lighting and soundscapes to form one of three major exhibitions marking 100 years of untold stories at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard.

Tours on board now begin with a new film narrated by British Hollywood star Ian McShane, highlighting life on HMS Alliance from WWII through the Cold War until the 1970s.

All the President’s Men – Thank Yous

THANK YOU’S

 Collated by David Lopes

 

  •  To the organising committee:  Cameron Kinnear, Don Ruffels, Steve Johns and Louis Rauch (who came up with the name “All the President’s Men”.   Without the work done by Cameron and Don this function would not have seen the light of day.

 

  • To those that worked behind the scenes:

 

Mike Wilson for the design of the table mats, video presentation and for sponsoring a couple,

 

Jackie Sedan for the scanning and printing, name tallies and assisting with the admin this evening,

 

Stan Slogrove for the donation of the wine,

 

WO1 David Harrison (Mess Press HUB) for the pictures and   video.

 

Printing Press for the printing of the placemats and SAS  SALDANHA for the laminating.

 

    Andrew Austin for the design of the 10FS T Shirts.

 

  Buddy Bacon for the display of his model ships.

 

  • Those that travelled from afar:

 

Mike Denny – Brakpan

Capt Thompson – Pretoria

Jody Joubert – Saldanha

Leon Malan – Gauteng

Laurie Rother – Saldanha

Stan Slogrove  – Calitzdorp

 

  • To all those that couldn’t be here this evening due to personnel circumstances and that sent messages of goodwill.

 

  • Adm Chris Bennett for the address this evening and the Master of ceremonies, Capt Robert Harm.

 

  • Finally a thank you to Hugo Biermann for use of their facilities, Submarine Training School (WO1 David Fobian) for use of the simulator and the caterers (PO October) for the dinner this evening.

 

Reunion Shipmate Messages

Shipmate Messages

Collated by Dave Lopes

 

Vernon Saayman

Evening – hope you all have a good time tonight. Thanks for the memories you have all made me remember for life. Sorry couldn’t be with you all. Hope you all keep well and love to your families. Keep strong and walk with pride.

 

Capt (Ret) Frank Charles van Rooyen (From Buenos Aires)

Where spouse Sonica [Captain (SAN)] is South Africa’s defence attaché to Argentina, Chile and Uruguay … I realised suddenly earlier this year that I was one of the lucky ones to have served on the last two SA Navy Type 12s up to their very last day of operational service (PKR as SLt – baby Nav – 18 Feb 82, PPT as Lt – Comms & EW officer – Aug 85). Best of times, super salty sea dog ships’ companies, wonderful adventures. Have fun this evening, share yarns, and let it go on until the Morning Watch! Will hopefully be there for next one. Shipmate greetings to all and your families. BZ to the organisers!

 

Marius Botha

Ek wil dit kategories stel dat die Vloot my geleer het van dissipliene en kammeraadskap, wat ek tot vandag toepas in my lewe. Dankie vir al die offisiere, Adj en senior manskappe; as dit nie vir julle was nie, sou my lewe seker anders uitgedraai het. Ek wil hulde bring aan die manskappe wat ons verlaat het na die ewige rus. Hulle moet nooit ooit vergeet word nie, want hulle het hul deel bygedra om die Vloot te help met die opbou proses. Weereens dankie  Ek tjank hier in PE omdat ek dit nie kan bywoon nie. Ek kan my net indink van al die stories wat gaan vertel word. Wou so bitter graag vir jou David, Harry, Tommo, Don, David Petrowski, Mike en die ouens wou ontmoet, daar is seker nog name, kan nie almal onthou nie. Asb sit die foto’s op, met die name, sal dit terdee geniet.

 

David Blyth

As one of those who cannot attend, I thank all those that arranged this function and those attending for representing us all in that which we did as members of the ships’ companies of the President class frigates. We share some history and I am sure are all proud to have served and shared. I trust that all the attendees will enjoy the evening and return home safely. Let us keep in mind those of us that have crossed the bar, particularly with the PK.

 

Sebastian De Beer

My father, Koos De Beer, will regretfully be unable to attend the function but sends his best regards to all his old shipmates that will be there. Next time please hold it in Freemantle so that he can attend!

 

Ken Welthagen

Hope all the presidents men have a fantastic evening, no matter where we are the uniform stays on and memories are forever.

 

GI Roodman

Regret unable to attend the reunion, but wish everybody the best and to have a toast on me.

Peter Burger

Unable to attend. living in Gauteng. Served PS. 74-76. RO. You mates that can attend, have a good one.

 

Mike van Zyl

Wish I could be there, have a good time and regards to all.

 

Paul Le Bas (From Western Australia)

All the best to the ‘Presidents Men’ upon your intended Reunion, next month. Even if only a few can through circumstances “make it”. You all who are there will make your time a good time. Full of respect for those “gone” those who may not be able to be with you. For the 1st time in 40 years, last year I went to Melbourne and caught up with a few. It mattered not how few we were, it was the memories of a time long gone. I wish All the “Presidents Men” all the very best! God bless you all.

 

David Petrowski

I’m sorry I can’t make it, but extend my best wishes to all that can be there. Enjoy the banter, drink with a mate, and think of those that can’t be there, as they are no longer with us. Cheers guys, have a moerse party.

 

Johan Swiegers

To all remembering Swiegie – have a great time guys!

 

Michael Franks

Unfortunately I will be stuck in Johannesburg due to business commitments; however I most certainly will be with you in spirit. I wish you all a fantastic evening together, and may this group continue long past it’s “sell by” date. It was a privilege to have served with some of you on the greatest ships afloat at the time. I salute you all. As “Beetle” Horn would say, I will have a couple of “wets” in your honour. God bless you all and keep you safe.

 

Don Slabber

Greetings from Pompey in the UK. Commissioned PP in 1964. Will be thinking of you guys in Simonstown. Enjoy. Slabbie

 

Adm Errol Massey-Hicks

Sorry to miss it. Have a wonderful Reunion

 

Greg Stringfellow

Wish all my shipmates a great time at the Reunion.  Sorry I can’t make it.  I am living back home in England.

 

Percy Oliver

Joined the PSN on commissioning in the UK under Capt John Fairbairn.  What I missed in civilian life was the camaraderie that we had in the service but I left the service a better person and had no regrets in joining up.  I am sorry I can’t be there with all the members of 10FS but I wish you all a great evening, a few good beers and to appreciate all the memories. God Bless you all.

A philosophical view of the SA Navy

A philosophical view of the SA Navy

by

Robert Harm (Capt, Retd.)

Background

I agreed to write a short epistle on the above after a discussion I had with Don Ruffles. The idea was born from the fact that there is a naval build-up taking place around the world, especially in the Asian theatre. I will refrain from discussing the reasons for the build-up, as they are vast, varied and complex. I am rather looking at the effect of technology on the navies going through the process of the build-up. In discussing this I can only state that the SA Navy has been very fortunate in its progress from a rather low level of technology to the present day high level of technology, as few if any disasters accompanied this progress. In this discussion it is assumed (this has never be quantified) that it takes navies (men and machine) roughly 10 years to master any new ship or weapon system.

 

Square One

The SAN became “independent” in 1957, and received as a legacy some ex-W class destroyers (one of them modified to Type 15 frigate), a number of Loch class frigates, Algerine class minesweepers, Ton class minesweepers, Ford class seaward defence boats and boom defence vessels. All these assets had been designed before WW2, and used the technology of that time. This also meant that the men serving in these vessels had the mind set of that time.

 

Initial progress

The Simon’s Town Agreement provided the first step up in technology with the ordering of three Type 12 frigates. These vessels were designed during the mid-1950’s and provided new technologies in main armament, gun direction and target acquisition, ASW weapons and sonars, radars and mechanical and electrical power systems. The ship’s complements for these ships were mainly trained in the UK as part of the building process. The decision to follow this process would prove to be live-saving, as this ensured the move from the older destroyers and frigates went relatively smoothly as men accepted the technological progress more or less in their stride even though some found it difficult. When the ships returned to South Africa in the mid-1960’s it was the first opportunity to learn to use this new weapon system to its fullest capability. This process allowed the SAN to modernise both Type 12 frigates and W class destroyers as following step-up in technology. Once again this step-up went smoothly, although it was made easier as the platforms remained the same. In this process no major accidents were experienced.

 

A new weapon system

Before learning to use the surface fleet to its optimum capability (in other words within the assumed ten year period), the next step-up in technology was undertaken when acquiring the submarines. This was a totally new platform, with new weapon systems and mechanical and electrical power systems. Having learned the lesson of the first acquisition programme, the complements were trained in France (from where the platforms were acquired) ensuring a high standard of training and acceptance of the new technology. However, a new leaf was added in that the project was driven as a turnkey project which included the complete manning, training and maintenance bases. This allowed the SAN to introduce this new weapon system seamlessly, and without major accidents. The submarines arrived in South Africa in the early 1970’s.

 

Another new weapon system

Development in the SAN never relaxed, and while the submarine project was being finalised, another new weapon system was acquired. The introduction of the strike craft into the SAN brought another set of new technologies such as high speed diesels (main engines) and gunnery system, missiles and target acquisition system. After the submarine acquisition project, the SAN followed a very similar approach to the acquisition of the strike craft, confirming that “success breeds success”. However, this project went a step further as six of the nine vessels were built locally. This confirmed that the technological lesson learned during the upgrading of Type 12 frigates and W class destroyers were put to good use. But this new weapon system was introduced before the SAN had learned to operate the submarine system to its fullest capability. In this case the SAN was in the fortunate position that the two weapon systems were introduced in separate geographical areas. But once again no major accidents were experienced, after this weapon system was introduced in the later 1970’s.

 

Summary

The approach followed by the SAN during these repeated step ups in technology has meant that new weapon systems were introduced without major problems and in spite of the fact that previously introduced weapon system had hardly mastered. No mention is made of the introduction of the new frigates and submarines as I have not been intimately involved with these weapon systems. It does, however, seem that the processes used in the past were not followed to the same extent in the acquisition of these weapon systems, as cost cutting seems to have had a higher priority than in earlier projects. This seems to have resulted in some major incidents (loss of main engine in frigate and required battery replacement), although these might also have been caused by cost cutting in maintenance systems.

 

Conclusion

Comparing the SAN’s technological progress with the progress in other navies, the SAN’s problems are miniscule when compared with other much larger navies. I am referring to the Canadian Navy’s problems with their submarines (they can barely keep one submarine operational), the Australian Navy (more or less in the same “boat”), the US Navy (problems with new technologies in the Ford class aircraft carrier, Zumwalt class destroyer and especially the new LCS (both trimaran hulled and single hulled). But the best example is the Indian Navy, which in the last two years have introduced a “new” aircraft carrier and a new class of submarine, and is about to introduce nuclear power to both aircraft carrier (new) and submarine (new). In the last 18 months they have experienced 10 major naval disasters (which have in some cases led to loss of life). This has led to the resignation of the Chief of the Indian Navy, who has assumed moral responsibility.

 

All the President’s Men

AllThePresidentsmen_n

 

SAS President Kruger Commissioned 3 October 1962.

SAS President Steyn Commissioned 8 April 1963

SAS President Pretorius Commissioned 18 March 1964

 

That makes it a total of 53 years for all three President Class Frigates to become operational in the South African Navy.

 

 We will be arranging a Celebration for all the ex-crew of the President Class Frigates.

Theme title: “ALL THE PRESIDENTS MEN” – title idea: (Louis Rauch)

 

Venue: TBA

 Proposed Date: Any day – Sunday 16 MARCH 2014 – Saturday 22 MARCH 2014.

 

Cost for persons attending: TO BE DETERMINED BY THE TYPE OF EVENT.

Contact us if you are interested, as further information will be released as arrangements progress.

 

Fitting farewell to ex-Navy Chief – V Adm “Woody” Woodburne

 

Fitting farewell to ex-Navy Chief – V Adm “Woody” Woodburne

 

 

Article and Images By Dean Wingrin

 

It was a packed Naval Chapel that bade final farewell to Vice-Admiral Lambert Jackson “Woody” Woodburne DVR, SD, SM, South African Navy (Retired).

 

Woodburne, who served as Chief of the South African Navy (SAN) from 1 July 1990 to 31 August 1992, passed away in Cape Town on 5 July 2013 after a long illness. The funeral service was held in the Dockyard Chapel, Simon’s Town on Thursday.

 

Born on 13 July 1939 in Kimberley, Woodburne is only one of two people to have received the Van Riebeeck Decoration, then the second highest medal of valour.

 

Demonstrating the high esteem and respect Woodburne generated during his career, the chapel was overflowing with family, friends, current and retired SAN personnel. This included current Chief of the South African Navy, Vice Admiral Johannes Mudimu and members of the Special Forces.

 

In a tribute read on behalf of V Adm Robert Simpson-Anderson, who took over from Woodburne as Chief of the Navy, V Adm Johan Retief (who in turn took over command of the SAN from Simpson-Anderson), noted that Woodburne served at sea, on shore and in office, when he was the military attaché in Argentina in the difficult years after the Falklands War.

 

Having joined the navy in 1958, Woodburne completed the Specialist Mine Warfare and Clearance Diving Course in the United Kingdom where he came top of the class. Woodburne went on to be the Officer in Charge of the Naval Diving School. Thereafter he commanded the mine sweepers SAS Mosselbaai and SAS Johannesburg.

 

When the SAN purchased new submarines from France, Woodburne volunteered for and trained as a submariner in France during 1970, becoming the first commanding officer of SAS Emily Hobhouse (S98) in 1971; a position held until 1974.

 

The SAS Emily Hobhouse landed Special Forces troops, led by Commandant Jan Breytenbach, off Dar es Salaam, Tanzania in 1972. This mission earned Woodburne the Van Riebeeck Decoration, together with Breytenbach. He later went on to serve with the Special Forces between1978 and 1983.

 

Following his stint as SA military attaché to Argentina from 1983 to 1985, Woodburne served in various capacities until he was promoted to Vice-Admiral and appointed as Chief of the South African Navy.

 

This was a particularly difficult time for the Navy. The Border War had ended and large cuts were being made to the defence budget, even more so for the Navy. Having endured years of tight budgets, even during the Border War, the Navy was in dire need of replacing its obsolete ships. Plans were put into place to procure four new locally-built frigates, which required the Navy to cur 22% of its personnel in order to safeguard the capital projects.

 

When the project was eventually cancelled, morale in the Navy was extremely low. It was through Woodbourne’s leadership, Simpson-Anderson said, that brought the Navy back from the brink.

 

Woodburne was always willing to listen to his fellow sailors, whether an officer or a seaman.

 

In his address, Mudimu noted that the name of Woodburne will be written in the history of the Navy.

 

“We speak here of a giant of that times. His actions will continue to stand in our hearts and his past actions still resound around South Africa,” Mudimu said.

 

“He gained the respect of all those in the submarine and Special Force communities,” Mudimu continued.

 

“He was always respected and admired. He was a great leader admired by many generations. He made a significant contribution to the development of the Navy. I salute this veteran.”

 

Woodburne was a keen outdoors person and is survived by his ex-wife Vivienne and daughters Jennifer and Lee.

 

SAS Pietermaritzburg Meeting

 

SAS Pietermaritzburg entering the Knysna Heads in 1953
SAS Pietermaritzburg entering the Knysna Heads in 1953

There will be a meeting held at the Simon’s Town Museum on 26th April 2013, at 14h30 to continue the process of declaring the wreck site of the SAS Pietermaritzburg a National Heritage Site.

 

The First Naval Fraternity Get-Together

 

The First Naval Fraternity

Get-Together

23 February 2013

 

On the 23 February 2013 we enjoyed a coming together of some of our old shipmates and partners.

 

The idea was born about March 2012.

 

I put out some feelers on the SA Naval Fraternity Facebook group – and had an outstanding response from the group. This led to planning of a suitable date.

 

Cameron Kinnear offered his services to help launch the get-together as he and Steve Johns had over many months put together the 30th Anniversary Memorial Service (February 2012) for those that lost their lives during SAS President Kruger’s sinking. His experience on getting groups together was to be invaluable to me.

 

The first important part was the WHEN part.

 

Cameron put a month/year grid on the Facebook group which yielded responses from many of the members – out of which came the date 23 February 2013 a date which was after Christmas and before the Naval Festival.

 

The second important thing was setting up a committee.

 

Help was sought and we had volunteers from Verrall Knott, Coral-Ann Viviers, Cameron Kinnear, and myself Don Ruffels.  Our first meeting was held in Verral’s home – Cameron had flown out from the UK on business and to attend this meeting, out of which came area/places/costs/catering, and best of all the idea of having a Naval Veterans organisation on the internet; once again Cameron stepped forward and launched the SA Naval Fraternity’s non-profit website. From that we had the means of communicating to a wider group. And the means of setting up a bank account and committee; The committee was formed from interested persons, Alicia MacLachlan (Treasurer) Coral-Ann Viviers (Secretary), Cameron Kinnear (Vice-Chair), Don Ruffels (Chair).

 

 

The third important aspect of the Get-Together was the WHERE part.

 

We had the date, we had the website, and we had regular advertising going out on all the naval groups on Facebook, we had a bank account, we had and EVENTS page on our website to take bookings.  Now we had to find a suitable place to host this all important get-together.

 

I contacted Captain Glen Knox who helped us set a meeting up (8 October 2012) with Cdr Greyling van den Berg (Naval PRO Simonstown) and Cdr Phillip Schoultz (Naval Base Simonstown’s caterer) and Captain Glen Knox who offered his office and sat in the meeting. Once again Cameron came out from the UK to attend this meeting – The important outcome was that we had a positive response from them and the venue was set SAS Hugo Biermann, Ship visits were proposed, Catering was in place, cost per person attending set; but the venue and ship visits and catering all had to be approved by FOC (Naval Base Simonstown). I wrote a letter to FOC emailed it to Cdr Schoultz who passed it on to him and ultimately we received Naval HQ approval to have our show at SAS Hugo Biermann’s wardroom.

 

Every thing now in place – but we needed numbers of persons going to be attending.

 

Booking through the SA Naval Fraternity website went off well and ultimately we had 96 who booked – we were hoping for about 110+. We informed those that had booked that the cost will be R110 pp (maybe this frightened many off) for as the events date was nearing only 47 booked person had paid. Cost of Catering, venue insurance, stewards was R5000 for 47 persons.

 

The forth and last important feature of our Get-Together was the Get-Together

 

My disappointment was that all the planning and work only yielded an attendance of 47.

 

BUT to my gratification and happiness the coming together at SAS Hugo Biermann’s Wardroom turned out to be a group of very happy people. We had some that even travelled from Johannesburg, Pretoria and Ermelo all enjoying themselves, interacting together and thanks to Cdr Greyling van den Berg the visit to the frigate was a highlight, ably managed by Seaman Maggie Tshbangu.

 

Unfortunately due to his commitment with the SA Legion UK and the UK Mendi and PK Remembrance Parades Cameron could not attend the reunion. He provided a donation to the submarine museum SAS Assegaai, formerly the SAS Johanna van der Merwe, one of three Daphne-class submarines. This also covered the cost of the visit to the submarine; money well spent and for a good cause. Many thanks to Arnie ‘Angel’ Soderlund and our tour guide.

 

Thanks to Cdr Schoultz, the catering turned out to be a tasty success. Of course I cannot thank the SAS Hugo Biermann’s Wardroom President enough for the use of the Wardroom, and the Barman, waitress for their time to make our refreshments and nibbles a needed ingredient in keeping all suitably watered.

 

Many thanks to Cdr Stan Slogrove, Andrew Imrie and others who snapped away with their camera’s and giving permission for the photographs to be used on the SA Naval Fraternity website as well as on our Facebook group SA Naval Fraternity.

 

Here is hoping that at our next re-union many others will come and enjoy camaraderie and interaction with their old and new shipmates and partners.

 

IMG_4559

Finally Proof  – One Happy Looking Bunch

 

(Full image gallery here)

 

 Planning for the next event(s) is alreaady underway; please let us know your thoughts by completing this poll.

 

Submitted by

Don Ruffels

(Retired Naval Warrant Officer of Signals)

 

 

New Logo

SANF_Badge_600x800

Mike Wilson has kindly re-designed the logo for the Naval Fraternity, which we will now be able to use for the planned mementoes.

 

 

Social Success

The First Annual SA Naval Fraternity Re-Union

 6711_10200089789505471_429967630_n

The Fraternity Social took place on the 23rd February, 2013.

 

 A most heartfelt thanks goes to all who assisted in the planning of this, and a specific thank you to Commander Greyling van den Berg and Sea Maggie Tshabanagu of the Public Relations Office, as well as Commander Schoultz for the catering.

 

In addition to the social, a tour of SAS Spioenkop was arranged, and a sponsor of the Fraternity donated funds for a visit to the Daphne museum.

 

The general consensus is that it is not to early to plan the next social!

Click to see the image gallery.

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HMSAS Southern Floe – 11 February 1941

vo013hka
Badge of H.M.S.A.S. Southern Floe which was picked up in an Italian dugout in the Desert by a sergeant in the Royal Army Medical Corps during the North African Campaign. (SA Military History – http://samilitaryhistory.org/vol013hk.html)

 

11 February 1941

HMSAS Southern Floe was sunk by a mine off Tobruk with the loss of 27 men, with 1 sole survivor, Stoker C J Jones


A number of whalers were converted to anti submarine roles and commissioned into the South African Navy for service, they were part of the South African Seaward Defence Force anti-submarine flotilla.

Some of them were sent to the Mediterranean and based at Alexandria, Egypt – the HMSAS Southern Floe, the HMSAS Southern Sea and their sister ship the HMSAS Southern Maid – which is seen in this rare photograph in Alexandria Harbour (In the foreground is the South African Navy’s HMSAS Protea, a Flower-class corvette).

In 1941 – the HMSAS Southern Floe (Lt J E Lewis) and HMSAS Southern Sea arrived at Tobruk on 31 January 1941 to take over patrol duties from two of their two sister ships.

Although submarines were not a threat in the first six months of the Western Desert campaign, numerous floating mines pointed to the existence of extensive moored mine fields. Except for the sweeping of the narrow coastal traffic route and harbour entrances at this stage there had not yet been time to locate these fields with any accuracy, much less to clear them. The main duty of the two Southerns was alternately to patrol the nearest section of the swept channel and to escort shipping along it. The port at that time was subject to air raids, littered with sunken wrecks and possibly active ground-mines. On patrol, the duties were complicated by sandstorms that strong off-shore winds extended for many miles out to sea, resulting in low visibility, heavy cross-seas, and much discomfort to personnel. To these conditions were added the menace of the mine fields on one side and an ill-defined and unlighted coast on the other.

On the morning of 11 February Southern Sea arrived at the patrol rendezvous, two miles east of Tobruk, but found no sign of Southern Floe. This was reported but caused no concern at first; it had blown hard enough all night for the ship to find herself far from her station at dawn. However that evening, a passing destroyer picked up one man clinging to some wreckage – all that remained of Southern Floe and her company.

This sole survivor was Stoker C J Jones, RNVR (SA), lent from HMS Gloucester to fill a vacancy just before Southern Floe sailed from Alexandria. He was almost insensible after 14 hours in the water, but afterwards stated that he had been in the stokehold when, at about 04:00 there had been a heavy explosion and the ship had filled rapidly. In the darkness, he had found his way into the flooded engine-room and struggled out through the skylight as the ship sank. He had seen a few other persons in the water at that time and later had done his best to support a wounded man. In the absence of other evidence there is little doubt that a mine, either floating or moored, was the cause.

The loss of the ship, although but a trivial incident in a world war, came as a sudden and grievous blow to the flotilla and to the SDF. The ships had spent a bare month on the station and at home few were aware that they had arrived and had been in action. The casualties were the first naval losses suffered by the South African Seaward Defence Force and the sense of loss in the service was profound.

A relic of Southern Floe was brought to South Africa long after, in the form of a small brass ship’s badge, found amidst the other debris of battle 70 miles inland from Benghazi. Supposedly it had floated ashore, attached to a wooden fragment of the ship’s bridge, and been carried thence by an Italian souvenir-hunter.

After the war Stoker Jones, the sole survivor placed a memorial notice in the Cape Town newspapers. He continued to do this for many years until he also passed away.

Information from Naval-History.net

Southern Floe (SANF), ship loss
ANDERS, John, Steward, 69637 (SANF), MPK
BOWER, Robert, Stoker 1c, 69935 (SANF), MPK
BRAND, Leslie A, Able Seaman, 69828 (SANF), MPK
CAULFIELD, Patrick, Steward, 69802 (SANF), MPK
CHANDLER, Charles R D, Cook (S), 69613 (SANF), MPK
CHENOWETH, Richard, Stoker 1c, 67420 (SANF), MPK
FAIRLEY, Alexander E, Sub Lieutenant, SANF, MPK
FARRINGTON, Charles E, Stoker Petty Officer, P/KX 81373, MPK
FRIEDLANDER, Cecil A, Able Seaman, 114703 (SANF), MPK
GARDINER, Elliott, Able Seaman, 67260 (SANF), MPK
GREENACRE, John H, Leading Seaman, 69677 (SANF), MPK
HEASMAN, Gratwicke E E, Engine Room Artificer 4c, 69784 (SANF), MPK
HOGG, Roy S, Sub Lieutenant, SANF, MPK
INNES, Ian McK, Sub Lieutenant, SANF, MPK
MARSH, Reginald H Y, Able Seaman, 69911 (SANF), MPK
MITCHELL, William N, Able Seaman, 69787 (SANF), MPK
NEL, Eloff R, Able Seaman, 69635 (SANF), MPK
NICHOLSON, Douglas O, Able Seaman, 66833 (SANF), MPK
PUGH, John R, Able Seaman, 66877 (SANF), MPK
ROBERTSON, William M, Able Seaman, C/SSX 25307, MPK
RYALL, David R, Able Seaman, 69999 (SANF), MPK
SHIMMIN, William, Leading Stoker, 69661 (SANF), MPK
SIENI, Joseph F, Able Seaman, 69788 (SANF), MPK
SNELL, Harold W, Leading Telegraphist, 69827 (SANF), MPK
STANLEY, Gordon J, Able Seaman, 66963 (SANF), MPK
WALTON, Dudley N, Sub Lieutenant, SANF, MPK
YOUNG, Reginald A J, Able Seaman, D/J 87257, MPK

Panel at the Plymouth Naval Memorial

 

SA Navy in World War Two

 

When World War Two broke out, the SA Naval Service had three officers and three ratings, and no ships.

By the end of 1945 9455 men had served on about 78 ships. These included trawlers and whalers but also three Loch Class frigates.

 

This video includes some interesting footage, including that of the naval guns on the Cape Coast, SAAF Ansons, and Women Artillery spotters.

 

Watch for the sewing incident!

 

 

Film courtesy of OkraJoe

 

Private navy to fight pirates

By Fiona Keating

A UK fleet created by a group of businessmen is seeking out pirates in the Indian Ocean.

Its armed vessels include a 10,000-tonne mother ship and high-speed armoured patrol boats. It will be led by an ex-Royal Navy commodore who is in charge of recruiting 240 former marines and sailors for the unit.

Starting in the next few months, the seafaring craft will escort oil tankers, bulk carriers and yachts around the east coast of Africa.

The company behind the scheme is Typhon, set up because the Royal Navy, Nato and the European Union Naval Force lack the vessels to patrol the area, which is as large as North America.

“They can’t do the job because they haven’t got the budget,” Anthony Sharp, chief executive of Typhon, told the Sunday Times.

“Deploying a billion-pound warship against six guys [pirates] with $500 of kit is not a very good use of the asset.”

Read the full article here

SAS PMB Protection granted.

SAS Pietermaritzburg-s
The SA Heritage Resources Agency (SAHRA) Council has approved the provisional
protection for the Pietermaritzburg for the period of two years.

The council will be putting a notice in the Government Gazette and on the SAHRA
website as well. The nomination for declaration is still ongoing but hopefully
this will be approved soon as well.

We are also going to have another public meeting regarding the nomination
as this is part of the formal nomination process according to the National
Heritage Resources Act 25 of 1999 and would like as many stakeholders to be
present.

Advance warning of this meeting will be published on this website.

(Information courtesy of Eric Mawhinney, Chair, Simon's Town Historical Society.)

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The SAS ASSEGAAI lives on as a Submarine Museum

Article and photos by Sea Dimakatso Khoza

SAS Assegaai, formerly the SAS Johanna van der Merwe, was one of three Daphne-class submarines acquired from France during 1970 to 1972, which became the first submarines to serve in the South African Navy. She is 58m long and had a complement of six officers and 45 senior and junior ratings. Fitted with 12 x 550mm torpedo tubes, she could also carry sea mines.

She was renamed SAS Assegaai in 1999 and was the last of the SA Navy’s Daphne class submarines in commission and finally decommissioned in 2003. Currently she is preserved as a floating museum but will be preserved ashore at the Naval Museum by 2013.

Visitors arriving aboard from the ferry

 

The Assegaai museum submarine gives those who have never been on a submarine the opportunity to experience life in a submarine and its intricacies, albeit for a brief visit. All tours are conducted by experienced volunteer guides who explain life aboard as well as how the boat was run and how the systems work. The interior has been perfectly preserved and one is able to see and experience all its equipment in the cramped setting – the tiny galley being an example of this.

One also get to experience the feeling of being in a boat underwater. An explanation is also given of how the submarine dives and how it surfaces at sea and you get to know many interesting facts about submarines. One of the more fascinating aspects being the generation of fresh air for the crew when dived.

The Captain’s cabin with one sink and a small bunk

 

The forward mess – three per two bunks

The museum is also informative for youngsters and children who have an interest in becoming submariners, as it gives them the opportunity to find out more on the career that they want to follow.

Two heads found in the submarine

 

Interesting Facts:

  • The museum is one of about five of its kind in the Southern hemisphere and the first in Africa.
  • More than 20 countries including Germany, United States of America and the United Kingdom have Submarine Museums.
Daphne Class submarine fact file:
Length: 57.8m
Beam: 6.75m
Draught: 5.23m
Shafts:  2
Displacements: 700(standard)
860 (surface)
1034(submerged)
Machinery: 2 x SEMT Pielstick 450kW diesel generators
Propulsion: 2 x Jeumont-Schneider electric propulsion motors
Batteries: 2 x 80 cells each
Speed: 13.5 kts (Su) 16kts (Sub)
Range: 4300nm @ 7.5kts (Snorting)
2700nm @ 12.5kts (Surface)
Torpedoes: 12 x 550mm tubes
8 forward (Internal)
4 Aft (external)
Complement:  6 Officers and 45 Ratings
(+ 6 to 10 trainees)

 

 

 

Navy News Week 34-3

 

NAVY NEWS WEEK 34-3

21 AUGUST 2012

Collated by Robert Harm, courtesy of Shipping News Clippings, Piet Sinke

Navy ‘running out of sailors to man submarines’                                                                        

Britain’s nuclear deterrent is at risk because the Navy does not have enough sailors to man its submarines, Ministry of Defence officials admit.

 

HMS Triumph comes into a naval base on the River Clyde Photo: AP

 

By Thomas Harding, Defence Correspondent 10:00PM BST 20 Aug 2012

Internal documents warn that a lack of recruits for the Submarine Service may leave attack submarines and boats carrying the Trident nuclear missile stranded in port. A separate threat comes from a predicted 15 per cent shortfall in engineers by 2015. One in seven posts for weapons officers at the rank of lieutenant will also be vacant, raising operational questions over the boats equipped with nuclear and cruise missiles. Many submariners are being poached by the civilian nuclear sector and those who remain are being forced to go to sea for longer and more frequently. Adml Lord West, the former First Sea Lord, said the situation was “very worrying” and he hoped the Navy had mechanisms in place to make up for the shortfall.

The gaps facing the Submarine Service are disclosed in the Risk Register of the Defence Nuclear Executive Board.  Under the “Risk” heading of “Submarine Manpower”, the MoD’s internal safety watchdog said: “There is a risk that the RN will not have sufficient suitably qualified and experienced personnel to be able to support the manning requirement of the submarine fleet.”  The Navy has a fleet of six attack submarines and four Vanguard boats that carry the Trident nuclear missile, but the personnel issues could mean they cannot be deployed.  The report found that the recruiting and retention of submariners was also threatening operations. “Inability to recruit, retain and develop sufficient nuclear and submarine design qualified personnel will result in an inability to support the Defence Nuclear Programme,” the document said.  It also questioned whether industry can deliver the Trident replacement, warning of the “erosion of manufacturing capability, cost growth, time delay, and poor performance of contractors”. The Navy is carrying out a senior officer manpower review looking at ways to improve “quality of life” for submariners. It is understood that some submarines are putting to sea with only 85 per cent of their full complement.  Submariners are subsequently being forced to deploy more frequently and do more jobs. When the hunter-killer HMS Triumph returned home earlier this year it had been at sea for 13 out of the previous 17 months. There are 5,000 submariners in the Navy, but with deployments lasting four months or more continuously under the surface it is proving difficult to attract recruits.

A “dearth of experienced mid-career people” is threatening the Service and would continue “into the next decade”, warned the Defence Nuclear Safety Regulator annual report.  Lord West said: “There’s no doubt that recruiting and keeping highly qualified nuclear engineers has been tough. Nuclear engineers have also become highly sought-after by the civil industry as this country has not trained enough.” A redacted copy of the Risk Register was provided to the Nuclear Information Service. Peter Burt, the director of NIS, which promotes nuclear safety awareness, said: “These risks highlight major pitfalls ahead and that Trident replacement is far from a forgone conclusion. How effective we are at mastering these risks will determine whether Britain can remain in the nuclear weapons business.”  A Navy spokesman said: “This report recognises that the Royal Navy has sufficient manpower for its submarines and we are confident that this will remain the case.  “To ensure that the Royal Navy continues its excellent nuclear safety record, we review the nuclear propulsion programme to identify and manage any possible future risks; this report is part of that process.”                  Source: The Telegraph – 21 Aug 2012

The remains of the CHAMAREL at the beach North of Swakopmund (Namibia) – Photo : Pierre le Roux ©

 

Tactical Assault Group East personnel fast-rope from Black Hawk helicopters onto HMAS Tobruk during a Maritime Counter Terrorist exercise in Port Phillip Bay, Victoria.

New sub gives Electric Boat a mission for the future

With Ohio-class replacement in progress, Poitras seen as right leader at right time

The fate of Electric Boat depends on the design and construction of a new class of ballistic-missile submarines, EB’s new president says. “I would say it is the future of EB,” Kevin J. Poitras said in an interview last week. Usually EB’s Virginia-class submarine program is in the spotlight, whether it’s because Navy officials are praising it for being on time and under budget or members of Congress are trying to keep it on track despite the fiscal climate.  But inside EB’s New London offices, most designers and engineers are focused on creating the ballistic-missile submarine that will replace the Ohio-class. It’s the first new design of a ballistic-missile submarine in 40 years. “The Ohio-class replacement is the next really big opportunity for EB,” Loren B. Thompson, chief operating officer at the Lexington Institute, a nonprofit think tank, said last week. “Virginia-class construction will continue, but in terms of the design team and the engineers, the future is all about designing a replacement for the Ohio class.”  About two-thirds of the company’s business today is building Virginia-class attack submarines. But when EB starts manufacturing the class of 12 ballistic-missile submarines, building each one, by sheer weight, will be akin to building three attack submarines. “It’s three times the weight and almost three times the ship to build. That’s a significant effort for us,” said Poitras, who has led EB since May. He predicted the company eventually will need several thousand more employees to do it. The Pentagon has recommended delaying the start of construction on the ballistic-missile sub from 2019 to 2021. When construction begins, and EB is at the same time building two Virginia-class submarines a year with Newport News Shipbuilding in Virginia, the shipyard could need as many as 16,000 people in Groton and at its Quonset Point manufacturing facility, Poitras said. EB currently employs about 11,400 people. The shipyard most likely wouldn’t have bought New London property from Pfizer two years ago if the Navy didn’t want a new ballistic-missile submarine, and would need only about half of the 4,500 designers and engineers it employs, Poitras said. “There’s no question EB is growing right now and will grow because of the Ohio replacement program,” U.S. Rep. Joe Courtney, D-2nd District, said. “And Kevin is the maestro of the program.”

 

‘Time went by fast’

Given Poitras’ experience with the Ohio-class replacement program, it came as little surprise to many at EB and in the Navy that he was chosen to succeed John P. Casey when Casey left New London to become executive vice president of General Dynamics’ Marine Systems group. Poitras was then senior vice president of engineering, design and business development at EB. He oversaw design and engineering projects, including the Ohio-class replacement. “This is a time when you want an engineer running the place rather than a manufacturing guru,” Thompson said, “because the Ohio replacement is going to be about development for the next decade, rather than about production.” Poitras, 61, has worked at EB for nearly 40 years. He grew up north of Boston in Haverhill, Mass., and graduated from the Maine Maritime Academy. He said he wanted to go to sea as a merchant mariner but there weren’t many ships to work on because of the Vietnam War. After driving by Electric Boat one day, he decided to apply. “I said, ‘I’ll stay here a couple of years and when shipping straightens out, I’ll go out,'” Poitras said. “Time went by fast.” He worked on ship overhaul and repair projects as an engineer, went into the yard when EB started building Los Angeles-class submarines, and continued to move up in the engineering and operations departments. The ballistic-missile submarine will be the fourth new ship design (including an aircraft carrier) he has helped advance to production. The work on the new sub is regenerating critical design skills at EB and in the industrial base. The Virginia-class design was 43 percent complete at the start of construction, Poitras said. Today, designers and engineers aim to complete 70 percent of the ballistic-missile sub’s design by the start of construction to lower the lead ship’s cost, which is currently estimated at $11.7 billion, including design. After the first, the rest of the class is estimated to cost $6 billion per boat, which the Navy wants to reduce to $5 billion, according to the Congressional Budget Office. The Navy estimates that building the 12 submarines will cost $78 billion.

‘Bullish’ on EB’s future

For now, Poitras said his main priority is completing the transition from one Virginia-class submarine to two annually, while continuing to improve them. “I don’t want to take my eye off the ball, so to speak,” he said. The Congressional Budget Office has suggested that the Navy could buy three attack submarines annually for many of the years between 2014 and 2023 to prevent a shortfall in the fleet. Poitras said meeting such a request would be “within the capabilities here, certainly,” since EB and Newport News each would build half of the additional submarine. The company faces a lull in its workload from October through January, but Poitras expects to hire about 250 people for the trades in Groton for 2013. He said it has been a few years since there were that many openings in the trades. Courtney said when it comes to the future of EB, he’s “bullish.” “The Virginia-class program is a keeper. It’s going to be two subs a year for the rest of this decade and, I think, beyond,” he said. “Then you’ve got what I think is the next big thing in the Navy, the Ohio replacement program, and EB is going to be right in the center of it.”  Sequestration – automatic spending cuts scheduled for Jan. 1 unless Congress acts – is a potential wrench in the plans. Poitras said EB may not be as vulnerable as others because of the contracts it has in place, and he is not preparing any layoff notices. But, he said, he is constantly watching the situation since one Virginia-class submarine could be canceled if the cuts are made. Despite the uncertainties about the federal budget, Poitras said, support for submarine programs within the Department of Defense and Congress is at a high point. He seemed optimistic, not only because of the projects on the horizon but also because of the people working on them. “Part of the fabric of the company is the people,” he said. “There are a lot of people like me that came here, liked the people, liked the work. It’s very rewarding. It gives you the opportunity to move around if you want to. You get up in the morning and you want to go work. You enjoy what you do and you enjoy the people you work with. I think you’ll find that a lot around here.”                    Source : The Day

 

 

 

 

 

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Navy News Week 33-6

NAVY NEWS WEEK 33-6

17 August 2012

Collated by Robert Harm, courtesy of Shipping News Clippings, Piet Sinke

Ship diverts to Australia, fearing asylum seekers

The captain of a merchant ship bound for Singapore changed course for Australia for fear that desperate asylum seekers he had rescued in Indonesian waters would attack his crew, an official said Thursday. Home Affairs Minister Jason Clare said the 67 would-be refugees could be deported to tent camps on the Pacific states of Nauru or Papua New Guinea under new laws due to passed by the Senate on Thursday aimed at deterring growing numbers of asylum seekers from attempting to make the dangerous journey to Australia by boat. The asylum seekers were still near the main Indonesian island of Java in a crowded fishing boat headed for the Australian territory of Christmas Island, 400 kilometers (250 miles) to the south, when they made a distress call to Australian rescue authorities early Monday morning, Clare said. The Australian authorities alerted all merchant shipping in the area, and Norwegian car carrier MV Parsifal was the first to respond. Having fulfilled his obligation under maritime law to rescue the asylum seekers, the captain ordered his crew to continue to Singapore, the ship’s intended destination. “When the asylum seekers on the boat found out about this, they became very aggressive and the master of the ship made the decision to turn the vessel around and head to Christmas Island,” Clare told Australian Broadcasting Corp. radio. The captain, who has not been named, radioed the Australian Maritime Safety Authority to explain his decision. “He made the point that he was concerned for his crew’s safety and therefore decided to take the ship to Christmas Island,” Clare said. Clare said he did not have details of the behavior of the asylum seekers, reported by The West Australian newspaper to be Middle Eastern men. But he was concerned that a ship’s crew could feel threatened after rescuing seafarers in distress. “It shows you just how dangerous it can be out on the high seas when you’ve got desperate people doing dangerous things,” Clare said. The asylum seekers were delivered to the immigration detention center on Christmas Island late Tuesday, hours after the government warned that any new boat arrivals could be sent to Nauru, a tiny atoll, or an island off Papua New Guinea, Australia’s nearest neighbor, to have their refugee claims assessed. The minor Greens party has condemned the plan as cruel. Clare said military reconnaissance teams would fly to Papua New Guinea on Thursday and Nauru on Friday to plan the new detention camps. He expects the first asylum seekers to be sent to Nauru within a month, although an agreement has yet to be finalized with that country’s government. More than 7,600 asylum seekers — many from war-torn countries, including Afghanistan, Iraq and Sri Lanka — have reached Christmas Island in more than 100 boats so far this year. A surge in boat arrivals and the deaths of more than 600 asylum seekers at sea in the past three years has prompted a tougher government stance.                                                  Source : mysanantonio.com

 

Russia to send navy ships to Kurils

Russia has announced that it will send two navy vessels to the disputed Kuril islands in the Pacific, which are known as the Northern Territories by Japan. The Russian Defence Ministry said the Pacific fleet ships are scheduled to travel between August 25 and September 17. The ships will visit three of the four islands to take part in ceremonies honouring Soviet sailors who died there at the end of World War Two. The dispute has strained relations between the Russia and Japan and prevented them from signing a formal peace treaty. Japan says the islands are part of its territory and wants Moscow to hand them over but Russia has rejected those demands. Dmitry Medvedev made the first visit to the islands as a Russian president in 2010 and went there again last month, this time as prime minister.                             Source : Xinhuatnet

 

Russian Nuclear Sub Sailed off U.S. Coast Undetected for Weeks

A Russian nuclear attack submarine sailed undetected in the Gulf of Mexico for weeks, a report said Tuesday, its travel in strategic U.S. waters discovered only after it left. The Washington Free Beacon, citing unnamed sources, said the voyage was only the second time since 2009 that a Russian attack sub has ventured so close to U.S. shores. “The stealth underwater incursion in the Gulf took place at the same time Russian strategic bombers made incursions into restricted U.S. airspace near Alaska and California in June and July, and highlights a growing military assertiveness by Moscow,” the publication reported on its Web site. The Russian patrol managed to expose deficiencies in U.S. anti-submarine warfare capabilities, American officials said, according to the report. Some of those forces responsible for anti-submarine warfare and detection are targeted for cuts over the Obama administration’s plan to slice nearly $500 billion from the Pentagon’s budget over the next 10 years. The Navy is responsible for detecting and tracking foreign submarines. The service uses undersea sensors and satellites to locate and track them, the Beacon reported. The report said the Russian submarine was an Akula class, a nuclear-powered attack vessel initially developed by the former Soviet Union in the 1980s to counter the U.S. Navy’s Los Angeles class subs. “The Akula class is the follow on to the Victor III and remains the most capable Russian attack submarine until the newer Yasen class is commissioned,” said a description from the Web site WeaponSystems.net. According to the Beacon, one U.S. official said the Russian submarine operated off the U.S. coast for a month. “The Akula was built for one reason and one reason only: To kill U.S. Navy ballistic missile submarines and their crews,” one U.S. official told the Beacon. “It’s a very stealthy boat so it can sneak around and avoid detection and hope to get past any protective screen a boomer might have in place.” A “boomer” is Navy vernacular for a strategic nuclear submarine. “Sending a nuclear-propelled submarine into the Gulf of Mexico-Caribbean region is another manifestation of President Putin demonstrating that Russia is still a player on the world’s political-military stage,” said Normal Polmar, a naval analyst and submarine warfare specialist. “Like the recent deployment of a task force led by a nuclear cruiser into the Caribbean, the Russian Navy provides him with a means of ‘showing the flag’ that is not possible with Russian air and ground forces,” he said. Navy officials had no comment on the report, said the Beacon.         Source : Newsroom America.

 

Chinese navy ships visit Israel’s Haifa Port

 

 The Chinese navy’s 11th escort fleet arrived in Israel’s Haifa Port Monday, starting a four-day goodwill visit. The destroyer QINGDAO (113) and frigate YANTAI (538) were welcomed by Israeli navy’s Haifa base commander Elyahu Sharvit and Chinese embassy officials. Haifa is the largest city in northern Israel, and the Port located on Mediterranean coastline is one of the busiest in the country. The flotilla finished in July its four-month international escort mission in the Gulf of Aden and Somali waters, after having escorted 184 ships in 43 operations. A total of 126 pirate vessels in 58 incidents were successfully driven away by the warships.                                                                                                             Source : Xinhua

 

 

 

 

Marine onderschept grote partij drugs

In het kader van de drugsbestrijdingsoperatie in het Caribisch gebied Operation Martillo is er onlangs weer een succes bij te boeken. Het stationsschip van de Koninklijke Marine Hr.Ms. Tromp voorkwam eind juni dat er 2.000 kilogram drugs over zee werd gesmokkeld. In verband met het vervolgonderzoek en nog lopende operaties kon deze informatie niet eerder vrijgegeven worden. Na de detectie van een snelle drugsboot, een zogeheten ‘go fast’, werd er vanuit het operatiecentrum op Marinebasis Parera te Curacao direct een grootschalige zoekoperatie opgezet. Diverse varende en vliegende internationale eenheden, waaronder het maritiem patrouillevliegtuig van de Kustwacht de Dash 8 en Hr.Ms. Tromp met aan boord haar Belgische Alouette helikopter, zetten een spectaculaire achtervolging in op de ‘go fast’, die zich met hoge snelheid verplaatste. Het heeft ertoe geleid dat de opvarenden de contrabande over boord gooiden. Op basis van schattingen van het Amerikaanse Law Enforcement team, dat gedurende deze operatie aan boord van Hr.Ms. Tromp was geëmbarkeerd, ging het hier om 2.000 kilogram cocaïne. De onderschepping valt onder de paraplu van de internationale drugsbestrijdingsoperatie Martillo. In deze operatie werken vele landen samen om de internationale georganiseerde misdaad in Midden-Amerika (en de Cariben) een halt toe te roepen door illegale smokkel tegen te gaan op zee en in de lucht. De operatie wordt geleid door de Joint Interagency Task Force South waar de Commandant der Zeemacht in het Caribisch gebied, brigade-generaal der mariniers Dick Swijgman als één van de ondercommandanten deel van uitmaakt. Swijgman, die tevens directeur is van de Kustwacht Caribisch gebied, noemt de recente onderschepping een groot succes voor de drugsbestrijding in de regio. “Tijdens deze actie is nadrukkelijk schouder aan schouder samengewerkt met internationale partners, de Kustwacht Caribisch gebied en de Koninklijke Marine. Het toont aan dat gezamenlijk optreden de sleutel tot succes is.”

 

Cassidian equips new Finnish Border Guard Patrol Vessel with high-performance Naval Radar Cassidian, the defence and security division of EADS, will equip the new Offshore Patrol Vessel of the Finnish Border Guard with its proven TRS-3D naval radar. The STX Shipyard in Rauma/Finland has awarded Cassidian a contract to deliver the radar by mid-2013 for integration into the new ship.

“To provide reliable surveillance data during the demanding Coast Guard missions in the difficult littoral environment of the Finnish coastal waters you need extremely powerful sensors”, said Elmar Compans, Head of Sensors & Electronic Warfare at Cassidian. “Our TRS-3D radar has operationally proven that it is the right answer to these challenging requirements. The radar is intended to provide a reliable and comprehensive situation picture as well as safe helicopter guidance and Search-and-Rescue (SAR) missions under the extreme environmental conditions of the Finnish littoral waters. TRS-3D is a 3-dimensional multimode naval radar for air and sea surveillance. It includes the ability to correlate plots and tracks of targets with Cassidian’s MSSR 2000 I identification system for automatic identification of vessels and aircraft. TRS-3D is in service with the “Squadron 2000” patrol vessels and the “Hämeenma”-class ships of the Finnish Navy. With more than 60 radars operated by navies and coast guards worldwide, TRS-3D is the market leader in its class. Among the ships equipped are the K130 corvettes of the German Navy, the US Coast Guard National Security Cutters, the US Navy Littoral Combat Ships and the Norwegian Coast Guard vessels of the “Nordkapp” and “Svalbard” class.                                                                              Source : Navy Recognation

 

36 YEARS SERVICE OF THE WESTLAND LYNX

The Royal Netherlands Navy SH-14D Lynx 283 aboard the De Zeven Provincien Class Frigate Hr.Ms. EVERTSEN F805 whilst on a short visit to the Grand Harbour, Malta on Saturday 11th August, 2012 of which will retire soon after 36 years of service.

 

Photo’s : Capt. Lawrence Dalli – www.maltashipphotos.com ©

SAS Pietermaritzburg – A Divers Report

This article , written by Georgina Jones, was first published in African Diver, and is republished here with their kind permission.

Nudibranchs of Pietermaritzburg

 

The SAS Pietermaritzburg (predictably always referred to as the PMB) was scuttled in 22m of water close to Millers Point in False Bay in 1994. It was an unusual end to an unusual surface career. The PMB was previously the HMS Pelorus, a minesweeper, and was the lead ship in the invasion of Normandy at D-Day in the Second World War, clearing the way for the Allied invasion fleet.

The HMS Pelorus, an Algerine class minesweeper, was launched in the Scotland in 1943. The Algerine class was designed for multi-purpose use, incorporating the lessons learned during the long war. They were large enough to accommodate equipment for detecting contact, acoustic and magnetic mines and as well as for detecting submarines. The Pelorus was, most appropriately, named after a dolphin called Pelorus Jack, which was famous for guiding ships through a dangerous sea passage off the New Zealand coast between 1888 and 1912. Like the dolphin before it, the Pelorus was mainly involved in convoy duty, but in the cold waters of the north Atlantic. Its moment of glory came as the lead ship of the Normandy D-Day invasion in 1944. For eleven days, the Pelorus and other minesweepers kept the aproaches to the beaches clear of mines, despite heavy daily shellfire from onshore gun batteries and nightly bombing by Luftwaffe planes. When helping clear the harbour at Cherbourg, the Pelorus was struck by a mine which lifted the ship right out of the water. There were no human casualties, but the ship had to spend three months under repair. No doubt Pelorus Jack, which survived an attempted shooting in 1904, would have approved. Though other ships of the Algerine class continued with minesweeping duties well after the war, the Pelorus was sold to the South African Navy in 1947 and renamed the HMSAS Pietermaritzburg. As the Pietermaritzburg, the ship was used rather more mundanely as a training vessel and minesweeper. It was decommissioned for the final time in 1964 and then used as accommodations for the Mine Countermeasures squadron from 1968 to 1991.

After some debate as to its possible future as a maritime museum, the Pietermaritzburg was scuttled by explosives in late 1994 to form an artificial reef. The wreck initially lay upright on the sand, and was used for extensive penetrations. There has been one fatality one the wreck: a commercial diver on a training course, who, along with his buddies, got lost inside the ship. They ended up in a cabin and all managed to escape via a porthole apart from one man, who was too big to get out and drowned there. A very sobering testament to the perils of treating overhead environments with anything less than utter respect.

Fifteen years underwater off the Cape of Storms have left their mark on the PMB. It has been seriously damaged by winter storms — the most notable being the storm of late August 2008, which twisted the deck out of true and left the ship with a distinct list. Further damage was done by the storm of June 2009, which ripped the bridge off the ship. It can now be seen lying alongside the main wreck. There are still possible penetrations which can be done, but the ship plating is rather fragile in places and looks unstable, so the smart money is on staying outside the wreck.

Not that staying outside the wreck is a chore. As well as being able to marvel at the changes the Cape seas have wrought, as an artificial reef, the PMB has few equals. The wreck is covered with all manner of marine animals, from sea fans to urchins and mussels. Seacatfish lurk in crannies and toadfish and blennies peer out from their hiding places. And for those who know where to look, the PMB is a nudibranch heaven. On an average dive, eight different species of nudibranch can be spotted, and occasionally, more than ten.

Warty pleurobranchs (Pleurobranchaea bubala) creep over the sand in search of other sea slugs to devour. Sand slugs (Philine aperta) burrow though the rich sediment in search of their prey of small molluscs and worms. These slugs fear few predators because they secrete sulphuric acid as a defence. On the wreck itself, gas flame nudibranchs (Janolus nakaza) light up dark corners. Two visually indistinguishable species of silvertip nudibranchs (Janolus capensis and Janolus longidentatus) are often seen. These two species have numerous physical differences when investigated under a microscope. To divers, however, the Cape silvertip and the medallion silvertip are only distinguishable by their egg ribbons, one being globular with many small eggs and the other being a flat medallion shape with fewer eggs.

Bright orange egg rosettes alert divers to the presence of the black nudibranch (Tambja capensis), a gorgeous animal with a bright turquoise stripe running along its body margin. Crowned nudibranchs (Polycera capensis) graze on fernlike moss animals. Purple ladies (Flabellina funeka) and white-edged nudibranchs (Flabellina capensis) hide among the fronds of their hydroid prey while orange-eyed nudis (Cratena capensis) flash their warning spots and candy nudis (Cuthona speciosa) dazzle the eyes — or would if they were any bigger. As it is, the longest is only 2cm in total length, but that makes them an even more exciting species to spot.

Perhaps being the host to a menagerie of extraordinary creatures is a fitting end for the namesake of an extraordinary dolphin.

 

Technical Specs

Algerine class minesweeper

keel laid down: 8 October 1942 at Lobnitz and Co. Renfrew, Scotland

launched: 18 June 1943

completed: 7 October 1943

Displacement: 1330 tonnes fully loaded,

Length over all: 68.6m.

Beam: 10.8m,

Draft: 3.5m.

Maximum speed: 16 knots,

Powered by: two 3-drum boilers supplying two 4-cylinder triple expansion steam engines and twin screws.

Indicated power: 2400Hp.

Range: 5500miles at 10 knots.

Crew: 115 men.

Armament : 2 x 4” guns, 2 x 40mm guns, and 4 depth charge launchers.

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